Your roadmap is loaded with ideas. Lots of stuff to build. Feature requests coming from all your stakeholders. Strategic innovations, cool new features, operations improvement and a new UI design. The sales guys increase pressure: they say the company/department/product will survive only when you ship feature X in the next release. Set aside product improvements, set aside operations improvements. X is your life-saver. You must ship X in the next release. Only X can open that new market for you…

Does that sound familiar?

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Tristan Gassert on Unsplash

The truth is: X is important. But it does not matter for the next release.

There is a common misconception about what your product can reach in the next release and also about what can be done in the next 5–10 releases. Growing a product is about ‘winning a war’, not just the next battle. The next release tends to be overvalued and the mid term goals undervalued. Next release should be business as usual: one new feature, one new customer, a UI design refresh or operations improvements. Chances are high that next release won’t be a blockbuster release — but rather a release similar to the ones you did before. Steady improvements, steady growth, no revenue big-bang. Business as usual. …


Photo by nikko macaspac on Unsplash

These days are crazy.

The corona virus lead to a shut down of public life as we know it. Some cities re-open, others lock down a second time. And we are happy about this because governments finally took action after, at first, ignoring an upcoming pandemic.

Nations are increasing trade barriers.

Some countries have good leaders, other countries are managed by notorious liars.

And this roller coaster ride keeps accelerating… economic decline, pandemic threats, home office, political chaos.

Economic issues move in closer and may really hit many of us. Some businesses will struggle, people’s health is in danger and the way we do business will change. So how can product management work under these contemporary circumstances? …


This guide describes a simple, yet elegant paper airplane. Built in 17 straight forward steps it takes a few minutes to create and, depending on kids’ age, will require some guidance/help. It comes with pretty good flight attributes and will beat most of the simple models. Your kids will love it.

Depending on the paper being used you may want to adjust the winglets (steps 15+16) to give it more uplift.

Start with a standard sheet of paper.

Image for post
Image for post

Step 1: fold it …

Image for post
Image for post

Step 2: … and open up again

Image for post
Image for post

Step 3: flip it over:

Image for post
Image for post

Step 4:

Image for post
Image for post

Step 5:

Image for post
Image for post

Step 6:

Image for post
Image for post

Step 7:

Image for post
Image for post

Step 8:

Image for post
Image for post

Step 9:

Image for post
Image for post

Step 10:

Image for post
Image for post

Step 11:

Image for post
Image for post

Step 12:

Image for post
Image for post

Step 13:

Image for post
Image for post

Step 14:

Image for post
Image for post

Step 15:

Image for post
Image for post

Step 16:

Image for post
Image for post

Step 17:

Image for post
Image for post

Done.


Lately I noticed an increase in ‘empty’ sign-ups for Productific: new users join but they do not create a product listing. While there is always room for improvement in the onboarding flow, the large number of empty sign-ups made me suspicous. Signing up for a roadmap voting tool without even listing a product just doesn’t make any sense. Once I noticed that many sign-ups to not appear in Google Analytics stats (which is running via javascript in the client browser) it was obvious: there is an increase in SPAM sign-ups. Automated scripts are flooding Productific’s sign-up form with dummy accounts. The business mechanics behind this are unclear (any ideas? …


Customers use your product in their business. They know what works well and where to improve, they can help you choosing the next feature to build. Feature voting gives you the ability to see which improvements are needed most by your customers. By voting for new features customers can shape a product roadmap according to their business needs. With the right tools they can be engaged to help your product grow.

Image for post
Image for post
Feature voting

Upvoting ideas and feature requests can be done in various ways. In this article we compare Productific to Google Sheets, Microsoft Excel, Trello and Asana.

Intro

We compare tools based on the following…


As a product manager you’re busy. And always on the run for new ideas. Between negotiating features, adjusting priorities and managing budget you’re looking for some spare time to read up on the latest trends.

There is lots of stuff to read out there and you don’t want to waste time searching, so where do you start?

Photo by Florencia Viadana on Unsplash

The following are the best blogs on product management and product strategy — follow these blogs and you’ll be in the loop on the latest thinking. The list is sorted by type of blog because each of these blogs follows different strategic goals:

  • Independent & Community Blogs
    These blogs usually host various guest writers and tend to maintain a high content quality on diverse topics while being a good source for new ideas. …

Your product has active users. Your product provides value. Users know exactly what they need to get their job done and that’s why they choose your product. There may be applications of your product that you haven’t thought of yourself. Your users can see features and markets outside your original reach. Let them tell you about these ideas!

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by G. Crescoli on Unsplash

On Productific you can have your users submitting feature requests and ideas. These new ideas help your product grow and increase customer loyalty.

The Product Influencer Board (your product listing) provides users the option to submit feature requests: they can ask for small improvements, for new features or for adjustments which adjusts your product according for their needs. …


Prioritizing the feature backlog for your product is a daunting task. An overwhelming number of stakeholders, variables and dependencies are to be considered.

As a product manager you face many questions: What gets built next? Which features get postponed or cut? What’s the difference between cutting and postponing? What gets done first? Should I build features for new customers? Should I incorporate known customer feedback? How do I best decide that? How do I reach consensus on prioritizing feature requests in my team? Should I listen to my boss or upper management?

This article provides guidance on prioritizing feature requests and product improvements. …


Your roadmap is loaded with ideas and now it’s time to decide what to build next. All stakeholders are happily anticipating only their feature to make it into the product — you need to take the decision. Does that sound familiar?

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Gian D. on Unsplash

Productific helps you choose the best ideas from your roadmap by prioritizing according to customer feedback. Identifying the most promising ideas is automated based on data. You can prioritize your backlog in four simple steps.

Step One To choose the best you describe your product improvement or development request on an idea feedback page. …


You have that genious idea for a product enhancement. Now you need to decide whether to actually build it. You need to find out if that idea actually catches with your users and how it ranks compared to other enhancements your users want. Should you go ahead, invest and build it, or better build something else?

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Luke Pamer on Unsplash

Productific helps you choose the best ideas from your roadmap by prioritizing according to customer feedback. Identifying the most promising ideas is automated based on data.

To start, list your improvement idea and describe it. Ideas can be anything like additional features, small improvements or major versions of your product. You describe what the idea does, explain which problem it solves and how it gives value to your users. Describe ideas from your users’ perspective you they understand where this goes. You can add images, sketches, and external links. Double check that your users can understand the idea’s intention and benefit when reading the feedback page. …

About

Frank

Writes about Product Strategy, Growth & Architecture. Creator of https://productific.com.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store