Are we evolving into a species of human teleprompters?


Seeing everyone’s near perfect lives on Facebook only puts more pressure on you to curate your best self. How would you do that if you’re not getting out of your room and participating in things? Now that the world is constantly reminding us of all the things that we could be doing (even go as far as to tell you what nearby events that your friends are going to), it has resulted in a symptom that many of us now carry called the Fear of Missing Out (FOMO). When you’re tired and want to go home but feel like you must go to the Meetup a block away beause who knows what could happen — that’s FOMO. When you join your new acquaintances for an epic night out after you told your parents that you’d be home for dinner — that’s FOMO.

But at some point after living years with FOMO, you may start to feel a little tired. Yes, there could be a chance that something life-changing could happen tonight at the comedy club, but it has happened 20 times and now the excitement isn’t even exciting anymore. That’s when you start looking around and discover great solutions like CouchCatchet — an app that makes you look cool by checking you into hip spots on FourSquare and posting pics of cool people hanging out on Instagram, all the while you’re eating ice cream and watching Netflix on your couch.

In a world that’s becoming more and more oversaturated with options, we are increasing relying on machine intelligence to help us make the best choices. Today it is recommending to us what book to buy next and what vacation to go on; who’s to say tomorrow it wouldn’t be recommending through your retinal display what witty question to ask next during your job interview in order to maximize your chances of success.

In year 2040, when machines give us an identity, and guide everything that what we do down to the minute details, will we become anything more than a news anchor echoing the words she receives through her embedded chip? Are we evolving into a species of human teleprompters?

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