Professor Dogbreath Answers: Why Does My Dog Lick Everything

If you’ve been around dogs, you know they love to lick. Recently a reader asked: “Why does my dog lick everything?” We thought we would turn that question over to our newest expert and our latest contributor.

We are excited to introduce Professor Dogbreath, an expert in dog behavior. Professor Dogbreath holds no academic degrees and has never actually been employed as a professor. He is however a grumpy old dog that has agreed to answer reader questions about dog behavior. So without further ado, Professor Dogbreath:

Q: Why Does My Dog Lick Everything?

A: A better question is why don’t you people lick more things! I don’t know how you get along day to day without using your tongues. You’re really missing out.

As dogs, we lick for a lot of different reasons. We do it to show affection, to taste something, or to mark something with our smell. We also do it for grooming and to help heal any wounds we might have.

Licking also helps us relax. It just feels good and comforting. Some dogs take it too far and lick compulsively. Not a good thing.

Q: Is there anything you wouldn’t lick?

A: No. That’s a dumb question. Why don’t you just check out the infographic below and stop asking stupid questions.

Thank you Professor Dogbreath. And thanks to BarkingRoyalty.com for the great infographic. The infographic was helpful, but you could have been a little nicer about it. Thanks for the great info.

A dog’s lick can indicate a lot of different behaviors with your dog. This is great information to have as a dog lover. The more you understand your dog, the better your relationship will be.

You also always want to be on the lookout for unhealthy compulsive licking and be sure to address it. It can be caused by a variety of issues and you should follow up with your vet.

Conclusion

Like Professor Dogbreath points out, if your dog licks you it could be a sign of affection, submission, or he could just like the salty taste of your skin.

If you don’t like your dog licking you, walk away and leave the room or break off contact. Eventually your dog will learn to stop. If you need help with training your dog, check out this free Everyday Dog Training Guide.

If you have any dog related questions you would like to ask Professor Dogbreath, drop us a comment below or check out Good Doggies Online.