We exist in divergent realities.

We, depending on our culture, degree of sensitivity, interest of study, and life events experience diverse worlds.

We presume we all exist in the same world but this is incorrect. We communicate as though others will comprehend ideas generated from a subjective reality, and either do not know or continuously forget this is difficult if not, most of the time, rare.

We intuit it is impossible to ever know everything but behave as though we are omnipotent.

Each field of interest teaches us a different way through which to understand this world. Our interest concentration characterizes unfolding events and relationships. We may understand bias but do we truly understand what depth this reaches?

The microbiologist visiting someone who loves animals will be disgusted by his host’s cat jumping onto the dining room table. The many hours spent looking through a microscope has rewarded the microbiologist a reality view of which the animal lover is ignorant. In contrast, the focus of tending and caring for pets has delivered an entirely different reality view. They may understand their differences intellectually but without access to the sensual information in each other’s brains, they exist in divergent realities. The biologist’s disgusted reaction as the cat prances back and forth on the table finally parking his backside upon where his host will serve food is startling. The guest’s exuberant expletive shocks the host.

In fact, the biologist is merely concerned for himself and his host’s health. However, the communication impacts as an insult and judgement.

This is but an infinitesimal example of the complexities that are not investigated since most of us consider the details of each other’s lives trivial. Of course, forgiving our dilemma, none of us are willing to expend the irrational time demand in examining each other’s acquired database of knowledge. This would require listening, something most of us are not proficient in.

Unfortunately, this appropriate neglect causes tremendous impacts to relationship health. This divergent knowledge affects overall communication and bonding in all areas of our lives.

We argue, dispute and generally disagree our points forgetting that we are debating uselessly. Unless we remember that another’s expertise has been accumulated in another area and keep this in mind when discussing any given topic, we will fail in our expertise sharing.

The animal lover and the microbiologist have a chasm of difference influencing what they say to each other. They see the world from relative far-flung angles and will have difficulty finding common ground. Given that this is exactly what we all face clarifies the why of our conflicts with each other.

Whole reality is a mystery since there is no one on earth who sees what truly is. We can but see snippets through our acquired knowledge. Each person’s database of knowing is uniquely sufficient for their own benefit.