Green-rumped parrotlet (Forpus passerinus). Male (right) and female (left), in Venezuela. (Credit: kulyka / CC BY 2.0.)
Figure 1. Least-squares regression of contact call similarities within pairs and within sibling groups of green-rumped parrotlet nests. (a, b). Dotted lines indicate confidence intervals. (a) r2 = 0.64, p < 0.02; (b) r2 = 0.62, p < 0.01.
Figure 1 c & d. Least-squares regression of contact call similarities within pairs and within sibling groups of green-rumped parrotlet nests. (c, d) Mean canonical scores of nestlings as a function of canonical scores of siblings within nests (c) in 2007 and (d) in 2008. Dotted lines indicate confidence intervals. (c) r2 = 0.71, p < 0.02; (d) r2 = 0.37, p < 0.15.
How a baby parrot learns its name in the wild.

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Evolutionary ecologist & ornithologist, science journalist. Freelance, job hunting. Writes about science for Forbes. Formerly: The Guardian. Always: Ravenclaw.

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