A very brief introduction to sociocracy

What makes sociocracy distinctive?

Slide 1 [Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License]
Book Cover of 2nd Edition, 2017
  1. decision-making by consent, as opposed to autocracy, hierarchical authority, majority voting and consensus;
  2. working groups / organisational units / departments are organised in circles. Separate circles are organised in a fractal-like, nested hierarchy. This is a hierarchy of domains of authority and not of power, control or coercion. Each circle is linked to the circles next to it [i.e. to its super-circle (or parent circle) and to its sub-circle(s) through a double link]. Image 1 below schematically illustrates a sociocratic organisational structure;
  3. feedback is an integral principle of all organisational activities and roles at all levels.
Image 1: Circular organisation. Taken from the book: “Many Voices, One Song: Shared Power with Sociocracy” by Jennifer Ted Rau and Jerry Koch-Gonzalez [Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License]

Pillar 1: Making decisions by consent

Slide 2 [Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License]
Image 2; Reproduced from: http://www.bluescorcher.coop/governance/

Pillar 2: Circles and Double-linking

Slide 3 [Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License]
Slide 4 [Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License]

Pillar 3: Feedback

Slide 5 [Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License]
  • take decisions that they think will help them achieve their aim (e.g. appoint a particular person as delegate; decide to hire more people into the circle; decide to invest in new equipment);
  • implement these decisions (e.g. person acts as delegate for the term of the role; people are hired into the circle, new equipment are bought),
  • use feedback systems (measuring and evaluation) to assess to what extent they have moved forwards (or backwards) in fulfilling the circle aim (e.g. the person is evaluated in their role as delegate by the other circle members; the output of the circle with the new members on board, or using the new equipment, is evaluated against the past output when the new members or the new equipment were not there).

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"Together we may find some of what we're looking for - laughter, beauty, love, and the chance to create" Saul Alinsky - Rules for Radicals

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Harri Kaloudis

Harri Kaloudis

"Together we may find some of what we're looking for - laughter, beauty, love, and the chance to create" Saul Alinsky - Rules for Radicals

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