Joan Trumpauer went from being a sheltered white southerner to a bold civil rights activist and Freedom Rider

Mugshot of Joan Trumpauer from their Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission Records Collection. (AP Photo/Mississippi Department of Archives and History, City of Jackson, File)

Even by the standards of the 1920s South, the chain of events in Rosewood were unfathomable

Ruins of Rosewood, Florida. The small town was almost forgotten after a white mob murdered and displaced black residents in 1923. (Bettmann Archive via Getty Images)

Over 70 years ago, the Harlem Globetrotters took on the Minneapolis Lakers, and changed hoops forever

Photo: MelanieWarner/Creative Commons

In Texas, some of the Germans actually befriended Americans of all colors

Prisoners forced to watch news reels of Nazi atrocities expressed surprise at the realization that they had been instruments in the perpetration of genocide. (East Texas History)

In places like Flint, Michigan, the story is very real

A Ford assembly line worker in Dearborn, Michigan, in 1963. (Bettmann/Getty Images)

Machismo was unrevolutionary

Members of the Young Lords seized a chest X-ray unit in East Harlem in 1970. The Lords’ elevation of women to leadership roles made them exceptional among the New Left groups of the 1960s and 1970s. But their focus on women’s equality was short lived—and complicated—as the “revolutionary machismo” engrained in the organization persisted. (Meyer Liebowitz/New York Times/Getty Images)

‘It was a fabulous feeling for me to be myself’

Trans advocate Sylvia Rivera, who helped spark the Stonewall riots of 1969, leads a 25th anniversary commemorative march for the gay rights movement in New York on June 26, 1994. (AP Photo/Justin Sutcliffe)

Today, the town of Nicodemus has just 21 residents

Nicodemus was the earliest and most successful black settlement of Reconstruction’s westward migration. (HABS/Library of Congress)

Freedman’s Village was a haven for so-called ‘contraband’ people

Residents of Freedman’s Village reading books outside their barracks in Arlington, Virginia, between 1863 and 1865. (Library of Congress)

Before 1970, they were considered white by the government

Cesar Chavez (left), leader of the National Farm Workers Association, stands with a group of striking workers in Delano, California, in 1975. (Ted Streshinsky/Getty Images)

Heather Gilligan

Journalist, onetime senior editor @Timeline_Now, bylines in @slate, @huffpo, @thenation, @modfarm, and more.

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