Is it all about the money?

Not a midlife crisis
Heading all too swiftly into my mid-forties I find myself surrounded by peers who are starting to reflect on the world, their life and what they are here for. Perhaps in earlier years this would have simply be described as having a midlife crisis, but I think what we are witnessing is a cultural change, manifested in many different ways.

When I was growing up nearly every ‘dad’ birthday card was aimed at the couch potato, men who just drank beer, watched football and looked for the TV remote control. These days, men of a certain age aren’t resigned to a life on the sofa — they’re often to be found lycra clad and out on their bikes, triathalon training or at the very least buying the January edition of Men’s Health. And of course, it’s not just the blokes who are searching for something more fulfilling…

I speak myself as a yoga bending, veg juicing, meditating, purpose-searcher, albeit with a penchant for a bottle of red and a curry. Us ‘mid-lifers’ are all at different levels of this process: there are still sofa dwellers, but this is a different world from the one in which I grew up. Many of us are seeing midlife as an opportunity to discover more about ourselves and our world?

Business finds its soul
I think this human evolutionary change is being mirrored in the business environment. There are companies out there that have successfully reached their social, environmental and economic sweet spot and this is benefiting their team, their environment and the community around them.

I look at such organisations and what I see are companies that love what they are doing, that have happy staff, that have not only found themselves but they like themselves and take pride in what they are doing. These companies have a sense of purpose and it’s certainly not all about the money.

Next steps
There are many ways in which you can seek to improve your business/get your business off the couch and into the cycle lane: Think about how you can reduce the negative aspects of your operations, perhaps reducing your environmental impact in some way or providing staff with more flexible working conditions.

Or you can step it up a gear, recognising that business purpose can sit beyond profit. So much more can be delivered with a broader vision: can you take a view of how your company can work to deliver much more value and still achieve profits and growth?

It will take some innovative thinking and a commitment to a wider purpose, but real positive benefits for customers, staff and your wider community can be achieved, alongside even more sustainable profit.

There may always be someone overtaking you in the cycle lane, or achieving impossible human contortions in the yoga studio, but you shouldn’t be put off taking part. In improving your business, just like improving your lifestyle, it is a journey, it is your choice to take part, something is always better than nothing.

Your midlife ‘crisis’ is an opportunity to take on some changes, to take the next steps.

I would love to hear from any connections about how their organisations have shifted focus to deliver much wider value, please share your ideas and successes.

www.honeymaker.co.uk — Building Better Business.