2–3 pieces of content, per day, per platform.


On Thursday, Aleks, Spen and I met with one of our mentors to talk strategy about Hydrated World and where we want to be with the company a year from now. We talked about how many retail stores we want to be in, how to increase online sales and how we can improve in telling our story and connecting it to our brand. Another important point brought up was social media content, with the obvious point being we need more of it. He mentioned that in a year from now, we need to be creating 2–3 pieces per platform, per day. We need 1 blog post a week, and a video every couple. Whether that is too much or too little is irrelevant, as everyone can agree that a successful company is engaged daily on social media. At first we were overwhelmed by the comment, how in the world are 5 part time employees going to manage such thing without sacrificing other parts of the business? Then we started to break things down:

Original content < 40%

Over 10 pieces of original content per day would be insane. Quality would suffer, ideas would diminish, and the 5 of us would burn out in less than a month. We need to leverage people around us. Have a friend going to California next week? Here’s a disposable camera and a tank top, mind taking 15 quick photos before you hit the surf? Know someone in the clean water industry? Ask if they would do 4 weekly blog posts about their experiences so far. The content is going to be original, hopefully high quality, and most importantly require no time from the core team. Most people like helping out, especially if it involves something they are passionate about.

Make It Easy For Others

An obvious, but extremely easy way to fill the leftover 60% is to use content already posted by followers. A company that I really look up to when improving social presence is fellow a Canadian, Herschel Supply Co. Looking at their Instagram feed, almost every photo is a repost from a photo some Instagramer had on their personal feed. Some of these photographers are well established professionals with thousands of followers. Others have a couple hundred, but happened to take a wicked photo that caught Herschel’s eye. What makes it so easy for Herschel followers to contribute to the companies feed are the campaigns they are currently running, #welltravelled & #citylimitless. Other than their product photos on their recent feed, every photo taken fits one of those tags. The beauty being that both of those tags have very broad scopes, but still generate a certain type of photo that fits the backpack brand. I’ve also heard, but not confirmed that if you are travelling, you can message Herschel of your trip and they will send you backpacks. All they expect in return is some photos they can use. (A tactic touched on above).

C’s Get Degrees

Nothing is perfect, ever. And neither will our content. Spelling mistakes will happen, and some photos will be subpar. But as long as they are good they count, and engage our users. We can’t worry about whether our next post will get enough likes, or the next blog gets more views than the previous. We’re too busy creating our next product line or getting into retail stores, which are tasks that will make or break our company. I’m not saying that the quality of our content takes the back seat, but I do know that we will waste a lot of time not posting things because we aren’t confident enough in our abilities. It’s more of a mentality than it is a question of effort and execution.

If Hydrated World is going to be around a year from now, we’re going to have to step up our social media game. Content is king, but it has to be good content, and not consume hours of our ever so valuable time. The balance is tricky, but we won’t know how it is done until we try. The infastructure to generate daily posts from both ourselves and our followers is the first step, and from there we’ll do what works best. The above are some observations we’ve had so far, and there are plenty more to come.

Ben

Hydrated World is an Apparel Company with a Mission to Eliminate the Water Crisis