Top 10 Bestselling Finance Books

If you’re starting out in a finance degree and you want to know what the most talked about books are, or if you’re in a different field but are looking for solid advice or an interesting read, here are 10 of the bestselling books in the area of finance.

1. The Total Money Makeover by Dave Ramsey

One of the biggest names in personal finance advice, Dave Ramsey, gives tips on money management for the public in this book. With a focus on paying off debt using the “snowball method”, the advice here is suited to someone who is new to finance and trying to dig themselves out of debt.

2. The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America’s Wealthy by Thomas J. Stanley and William D. Danko

This compilation of research into self-made millionaires in the US describes the attitudes, strategies, and habits that they have around money and finance. The authors boil down the various perspectives to a few key points, like the essential advice to spend less than you earn. This book will suit those who enjoy a dose of narrative along with their finance advice.

3. The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine by Michael Lewis

This work chronicles the build up to the housing crisis in the US during the 2000s, examining how the housing bubble grew and what causes it to burst. An accessible and exciting read, this book shows how topics in finance can be presented to a general audience in an engaging way, and how financial decisions can have a large impact on a society.

4. The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable by Nassim Nicholas Taleb

Covering statistics, economics, and philosophy as well as finance, this book examines how rare and unpredictable events can have an outsized effect on the way that we think and make decisions. It tackles the issue of investment and risk, looking at the difficulties inherent in trying to predict outcomes in highly complex systems.

5. I Will Teach You to be Rich by Ramit Sethi

Another personal finance bible for the masses, I Will Teach You to Be Rich is based on a blog of the same name which offers straightforward, easy to follow advice on money management topics like creating a budget or cultivating multiple income streams.

6. Your Money Or Your Life: Transforming Your Relationship with Money and Achieving Financial Independence by Joe Dominguez and Vicki Robin

This book advocates a simple living approach for people struggling with debt or other money issues, encouraging them to relentlessly prune their belongings and expenditures to focus on what is vital for happiness and nothing else.

7. The Psychology of Investing by John Nofsinger

Professor of finance John Nofsinger presents a smart summary on how investment decisions are made — both the financial factors which go into making a good investment, and the psychological approach which allows people to identify them. The topic means the book will be of broad interest, but it’s particularly useful for those who want to start investing themselves.

8. Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert T. Kiyosaki

This classic tome from all the way back in 1997 teaches the basics of financial topics like investment, real estate, and owning a business, through a series of parables based on the author’s life. The engaging style proved popular with a general audience and it’s still on many bestsellers lists today.

9. Women & Money: Owning The Power To Control Your Destiny by Suze Orman

Suze Orman presents this beginner’s guide to finance, aimed at women specifically. She examines the issues that women face when it comes to finance, like managing your career and negotiating a salary, or why women don’t invest to the same extent that men do and how they can start building their wealth.

10. The Behavior Gap: Simple Ways to Stop Doing Dumb Things with Money by Carl Richards

A humorous and easy-to-read book which chronicles all the bad decisions which people commonly make when it comes to finance. Rather than giving specific advice, it aims to challenge the way people think about money and help them to make better choices by being aware of their biases.

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