Image for post
Image for post

By: Martha Molfetas

We know being cooped up can make even the most ardent home-body go stir crazy. We also know that if you’re getting our emails, you care deeply about climate and environmental injustice. Here’s a shortlist of five things you can do that are good for the environment, starting with Earth Hour!

  1. Participate in Earth Hour! This Saturday, March 28th at 8.30pm (your local time) — shut off all your lights and devices to help cut emissions. Maybe use the time to play cards by candlelight with your family. Learn more about Earth Hour here.
  2. Recycle! Even here in NYC where nearly everything is shut down, waste management is still making collections. You can check out some info on how to recycle and resources to seek out on our website here. …

Image for post
Image for post

Our Executive Director, Martha Molfetas, is featured on the Climate 2020 Climate Chats podcast! Have a listen learn more about our work, and how sea level rise will impact coastal communities in the US and around the world.

Listen here.

SOME INFO ABOUT THE PODCAST EPISODE AND PODCAST SERIES, FROM THE CLIMATE CHATS:

By the end of March 2020, the Research and Transfer Centre “Sustainability and Climate Change Management” will be organizing a worldwide online climate conference, CLIMATE 2020. We will invite presenters, organizers and partners of the conference on to the Climate Chats podcast for quick chats around their fields of expertise. The first guest in this series is Martha Molfetas:

Martha Molfetas is the Executive Director & Founder of Impact Human, an environmental justice outreach education NGO based in New York City. She’s also a Policy Researcher, Strategist, Writer and Consultant on climate, security, development, and resource issues. Impact Human uses photography, interviews, and policy research to educate the public on human rights and environmental injustices faced by communities coping with climate change and pollution. Impact Human believes stories have the power to change perspectives and inspire action, that stories can bridge the gap between understanding and action.


By: Jessica Toale

Jess is a political and international development specialist. She’s spent over a decade working as an advisor to politicians in the UK parliament, and with UN Agencies and governments around the world. She’s had her work on foreign and international development policy published in The Guardian, The New Internationalist and the Fabian Society. She’s also spoken at key international development policy events at Chatham House, RUSI, the Fabian Society, and PS21 to name a few.

Image for post
Image for post

The city of Cape Town is famously nestled around the base of Table Mountain, peering out over the south Atlantic Ocean. Its location has made it a meeting point for centuries — from Dutch and British colonial traders, to the tourists of today who come for the breathtaking coastal views and green rolling vineyards. …


By: Martha Molfetas

Impact Wins: these days, it can seem like good news rarely happens — especially in relation to climate change and the environment we all rely on. Once a month, you can expect a blog from us that features some good news on climate action and environmental protection.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by: Martha Molfetas | From our ‘Another Summer Lost: Algae and Red Tide Blooms in Fort Myers’ project

If soil is unhealthy, the crops they produce will be unhealthy. For decades, intensive farming practices have reduced soil health and nutrition here in the United States. Monoculture, or where farms produce a single crop, is the standard practice here in the states and for other industrialized societies, but it severely damages soil health and depletes soil nutrients. It even adds to emissions. Nutrients lost have to be added chemically back into the soil, but it comes at a large environmental cost. The over-use of chemicals and pesticides in large-scale agriculture inevitably ends up in bodies of water, creating dead-zones through algae blooms. …


By: Matthew Goldberg

Matt heads fundraising, humanitarian assistance, and grant implementation efforts at BioLite — a clean energy company that designs and manufactures products that transform the way off-grid households cook, charge devices, and light their homes. A graduate of the London School of Economics, Matt is dedicated to advancing market-based initiatives that expand clean energy access and combat climate change. Matt has previously worked as a researcher and policy analyst focusing on the role of non-state actors in international and national climate policy. …


By: Martha Molfetas

Impact Wins: these days, it can seem like good news rarely happens — especially in relation to climate change and the environment we all rely on. Once a month, you can expect a blog from us that features some good news on climate action and environmental protection.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by: Femke Gubbels | From our ‘Displacement in Dar es Salaam’ project

The world just got some amazing news, last week the European Union (EU) did something unexpected — they banned single use plastics! Right now, the ten plastic items banned account for 70% of all the litter on Europe’s beaches and waterways. …


By: Alex Foote

Alex Foote works in the recycling and paper manufacturing industry in New Jersey. Previously she studied sustainable development at the London School of Economics, with research focuses on China’s urban pollution and rural conservation practices. You can follow her on Twitter @afootie

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by: Martha Molfetas | From our ‘Miami Sea Level Rise’ project

Know that feeling when you’re out, finish a drink, and are about to throw the bottle away when you realize there are no recycling bins nearby? Then you spend an hour carrying around your trash? This is sort of the predicament Western countries are in now. Last July, China’s government announced that the country would no longer accept foreign garbage below a certain quality level after January 2018, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate health dangers brought by tainted waste.


By: Martha Molfetas

We’ll be sharing more on this in our upcoming project, ‘Another Summer Lost: Algae and Red Tide Blooms in Fort Myers’

Image for post
Image for post
By: Martha Molfetas, from Impact Human’s upcoming project.

We went to the Fort Myers area over Labor Day Weekend, not really knowing what to expect. News reports over the last four months told a story of fish die offs and health impacts from the gasses algae and red tide emit. We saw the footage of manatees, 100-year old turtles, and a whale shark — all washed up against those once pristine Florida beaches, only to later be carted off to a dumpster. A far cry from the majesty of those unique creatures. …


By: Martha Molfetas

Impact Wins: these days, it can seem like good news rarely happens — especially in relation to climate change and the environment we all rely on. Once a month, you can expect a blog from us that features some good news on climate action and environmental protection.

Image for post
Image for post

It’s not new to anyone, air pollution is bad news. It prematurely kills 600 million people every year. Researchers found that inhaling polluted air over a prolonged period increases the risks for developing dementia and Alzheimer’s later in life. It even impacts the health of our soils and the food we consume. Despite recent clean energy wins, overall emissions are increasing globally, a 41% increase from 1990 to 2017. Certain developing countries produce the most air pollution globally, while developed countries like the United States and Spain are all seeing cuts to emissions. …


By: Martha Molfetas

Impact Wins: these days, it can seem like good news rarely happens — especially in relation to climate change and the environment we all rely on. Once a month, you can expect a blog from us that features some good news on climate action and environmental protection.

For those following climate news, kids taking the government to court over climate change no longer has the shock factor it once did. It looks like the kids will be more than alright — it looks like they may actually win in the courts. There are several proceedings happening simultaneously, all involving kids usually younger than 17-years old, going to the mattresses for their futures. …

About

Impact Human

IH increases awareness on #environmental & #humanrights injustices via #photography, #interviews, & #policy #research on #climatechange & #pollution

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store