SPARE PARTS BAKED THEM FROM THE 3D PRINTER

It breaks a piece of iron, vacuum cleaner or the fryer? Do not worry, it turns out as a new 3D printer. A French giant specializing in small household appliances in Italy sells various brands in France is experimenting with a system of spare parts produced on request, through 3D printers.
Today, to meet customer demand, the company focuses orders in the former factory, in France, on the border with Germany and Switzerland. A warehouse containing 5.7 million pieces of more than 40 thousand products for ten years are covered by a warranty repair. But the 15 thousand square meters of store of spare parts have a budget cost. And the company has to “guess” how many pieces produced by programming the number to be stocked after a product is released from the catalog, to respond to any requests covered by a ten-year guarantee. Why we want to switch to a more flexible service model.

“The project started in 2015 and took a year to study technology”, to identify the technologies and 3D printers more suited to their needs. “Now we have two operating. At the time of printing only the plastic parts, we are also doing tests on the metal parts. “ Just as you are working on the design of some products, to make it easier to copy by 3D printers. “We are also measuring the degree of customer satisfaction. The parts produced by 3D printers are white instead of gray that we normally use. It would not be a problem to print with a gray polymer, but we want to see if customers are willing to accept parts that have a small difference, even if they perform the same functions. “
If the test in France will give good results, there is the intention to expand the service to other countries. The investment of hundreds of thousands of euro, also includes the development of an automated system which manages printing of parts required applications and programs. It will take a few years before you see each deliver a spare printed in 3D, because before going emptied the warehouse. At that point, the company plans to rely on a network of widespread press centers to provide spare parts to customers. The first results are expected in 2017.Si breaks a piece of iron, vacuum cleaner or the fryer? Do not worry, it turns out as a new 3D printer. Groupe Seb, French giant specializing in small household appliances in Italy sells brands Rowenta, Moulinex, Krups and Tefal, is testing in France a system of spare parts produced on request, through 3D printers.
Today, to meet customer demand, the company focuses orders in the former factory of Faucogney-et-la-Mer, in France, on the border with Germany and Switzerland. A warehouse containing 5.7 million pieces of more than 40 thousand products for ten years are covered by a warranty repair. But the 15 thousand square meters of store of spare parts have a budget cost. And the company has to “guess” how many pieces produced by programming the number to be stocked after a product is released from the catalog, to respond to any requests covered by a ten-year guarantee. Why Groupe SEB intends to move to a more flexible service model.

“The project started in 2015 and took a year of study of technology,” says the vice president of the group, Alain Pautrot. Seb did scouting in California to identify the technologies and 3D printers more suited to their needs. “Now we have two operating. — The manager goes -When printing only the plastic parts, we are making the tests also on the metal parts. “ Just as you are working on the design of some products, to make it easier to copy by 3D printers. “We’re measuring the degree of satisfaction of customers-continues Pautrot -. The parts produced by 3D printers are white instead of gray that we normally use. It would not be a problem to print with a gray polymer, but we want to see if customers are willing to accept parts that have a small difference, even if they perform the same functions. “
If the test in France will give good results, Seb is keen to expand the service to other countries. The investment of hundreds of thousands of euro (Pautrot declined to declare figures on this), includes also the development of an automated system which manages printing of parts required applications and programs. It will take a few years before you see each deliver a spare printed in 3D, because before going emptied the warehouse. At that point, the company plans to rely on a network of widespread press centers to provide spare parts to customers. The first results are expected for 2017.

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.