LinkedIn tip: How to turn off activity broadcasts

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IT pros have a lot of questions about LinkedIn, from how to use it to job hunt to tips and tricks for networking. But one of the most frequently asked questions people ask me is how to turn off activity broadcasts.

Activity broadcasts are the updates that LinkedIn posts on your behalf to your network and to the Recent Activity section of your profile. LinkedIn does this when you make changes like adding skills, changing your profile picture, posting recommendations or following companies, among other actions. (If you’re interested in seeing what actions are posted to your profile now, scroll to the Recent Activity section of your profile and click “See all activity.”)

Why is this important? If you’re on the hunt for a new job, you’re probably polishing your profile or following companies you’d potentially want to work for to keep tabs on new job postings. To avoid publishing these updates to your network and to the Recent Activity section of your profile — possibly tipping off your current manager that you’re looking to move — it’s best to turn this setting off.

To do so, click the “Me” icon at the top of your LinkedIn page, then select “Settings & Privacy.” At the top of the page, click on the “Privacy” tab, then click Change next to “Sharing profile edits.” The module will expand, and if you then click on the toggle you will change your preference from sharing updates with your network to not sharing them. The change will be automatically saved.

Just note that while changing this setting will limit most of your updates from publishing, there are some activities that will post regardless, LinkedIn says. These include any content you share; following an influencer, channel, or publisher; and liking and commenting on shared content. If you don’t want any of these things shared, LinkedIn advises you don’t participate in those activities.


Originally published at www.computerworld.com on May 12, 2017.

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