It’s Absurd How Much We Suck as a Nation
Holly Wood, PhD 🌹
19444

With all due respect to your request, allow me to propose an alternative.

How about we teach by example? Rather than apologizing for our open-air insane asylum called America, we adults can partner with children in projects based on the educational principle of learning by doing. After all, talk’s cheap; it’s what you do that counts.

As a starting point, we can engage in truth-telling, providing an accurate and forthright estimate of the situation. Propping up sugar-coated fantasies never achieved anything meaningful anyway.

It’s fairly common knowledge that America’s founding fathers merely paid lip service to the human rights espoused by Thomas Paine as a cover story narrative to conceal their real estate speculation that necessitated native genocide, and to continue reaping the rewards of slave labor. Buy your kids a copy of A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn, and discuss it with them around the dinner table.

Ask them what they think we should do about the consequences of 200 years of Christian White Supremacy. Then, help them apply their research to school and community projects. Support them in making amends for America’s crimes against humanity. Show them how to effectively assume civic responsibilities. Explain to them the duties of citizenship.

Free to Expose Corruption, International Journal of Communication 2016, examines the impact of media freedom, internet access, and governmental online service delivery on corruption. With the caveat that corrupt regimes have learned to use the Internet to their advantage, the authors note that blogs, citizen journalism, and social networking sites (SNS) “produce the type of content that is necessary for accomplishing the social functions formerly filled by newspapers”.

Help your kids produce multi-media projects that honor Paine and Zinn and other Americans who walked the talk. Then, if you still feel like apologizing, they will have good reason to forgive you.

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