NaNoWriMo doesn’t require us to force writing on ourselves, it does require us to figure out a plan.

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Photo by Estée Janssens on Unsplash

I’ve taken part in NaNoWriMo for 13 years, and every year, the same two arguments against NaNoWriMo spring up:

  1. I can’t force myself to write
  2. Quantity is against quality

Writers who never consider taking part in NaNoWriMo often give me the same reason why they wouldn’t: I can’t force myself to write.

This is a common misconception with NaNoWriMo: if we want to achieve the 50k word in one month, we’ll have to force ourselves to write even on days we don’t feel like it because those days happen.

And I agree. Days we don’t feel like writing happen, sometimes frequently. But I wonder: if we want to make writing more than a hobby, will we still rely on the elusive inspiration to go on? …


Quantity may be the way to quality. We need to write — and write a lot — to become good writers.

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Photo by Natalie Grainger on Unsplash

I’ve been taking part in NaNoWriMo for 13 years, and every year, the same two arguments against NaNoWriMo spring up:

  1. I can’t force myself to write
  2. Quantity is against quality

It is a common thought in the writing community that if we write a lot, that writing won’t be of very high quality.

Now, I find this a very general statement. I am indeed a slow writer, and I’m not able to write a lot in general, less so if I go after quality. …


Let’s talk about the worthy of The Hobbit and how the Rohirrim are a vision of hope.

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Photo by Edan Cohen on Unsplash

So, I finally took action and created my Middle-earth Literary Gazette Facebook page. Please join if you feel so inclined. I’ll be sharing lots more material there than I usually do here on the Tolkien Monthly… also some more fun stuff, together with the more ‘serious’.

I will eventually create an Instagram page too. But that’s a project for the future.

What makes The Hobbit special?

by Olga Polomoshnova

“Easy-to-read, light, at times whimsical and playful, full of jests, The Hobbit differs from the elevated, archaic style of both of these epics. Even thus said, ‘light’ in case of Tolkien does not mean ‘simple’. “

With these words, Olga pinned down one of the most overlooked aspects of The Hobbit, a book that many readers consider childish and not really as worthy as Tolkien other stories, especially in the legendarium. …

About

JazzFeathers

Author of historical fantasy novels set in the 1920s | Dieselpunk | 1920s social history blogger | Hopeless Tolkien nerd https://theoldshelter.com/

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