Energy, democracy, community

How can we build a transition to renewable energy that doesn’t leave the already marginalized behind?

Not your typical school board meeting

Who is accumulating all the new wealth being generated on our decentralizing electrical grid?

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Worker-owners from Evergreen Energy Solutions install solar panels on a Cleveland rooftop.
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In the same way that a community garden can be the living heart of a low-income neighborhood or a first beachhead of gentrification, “community solar” can be a vehicle of inclusion, or merely a way for well-off apartment dwellers to participate alongside their suburban compatriots.

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Sheperdstown. WV residents celebrate the crowdfunded solar power system on a local church
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Is a highly financialized energy market dominated by unaccountable concentrations of capital the best we can hope for, with maybe some regulation and after-the-fact inclusionary measures thrown in as consolation prizes?

Further reading and resources:

Written by

Director of Communications at The Democracy Collaborative, co-founding worker-owner at Red Emma’s.

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