Boost the performance of your Mac by upgrading your storage.

An iMac sitting on a desk.
An iMac sitting on a desk.
Photo by Jessy Smith

Everything on your computer— All of your photos and documents, the programs you use, and even the operating system itself — are stored on your hard drive. If your hard drive is too slow you will notice it immediately, as your computer and programs take multiple seconds or minutes to open completely. For many users, a slow hard drive will affect performance even greater than a slow processor or other component. Luckily, there is a solution: Solid State Drives (SSD).

Most computers use traditional, spinning hard drives (HDD) to store all your files. These drives function similarly to CDs or records: They store all your information on a disk or platter inside the drive itself, and an arm inside reads the data as the disk spins. …


Boost the performance of your Mac by upgrading your storage.

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Photo by Jessy Smith

Everything on your computer — your photos and documents, the programs you use, and even the operating system itself — is stored on your hard drive. If your hard drive is too slow, you get frustrated when your computer and programs take multiple seconds or minutes to open completely. For many users, a slow hard drive affects performance more obviously than any other component. Luckily, there is a solution: a Solid State Drive (SSD).

Traditional Hard Drives


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Photo by Tim Gouw on Unsplash

Parenting gives you no shortage of things to worry about for your children, and technology is no exception. The digital world is as commonplace at school and daycare as it is at home. Children are alone with technology from a very young age. You’ll want to make sure your children are safe online, aren’t misusing apps, and aren’t making accidental in-app purchases. You’ll also want to make sure your child stays engaged with the world around them. And on top of all that, you don’t want to worry about them breaking an expensive device. …


Losing Your Data Would be Devastating!

Walking you through Apple’s built-in backup software.

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Everyone has important digital files these days. Maybe your family photo albums are stored on your computer, or you have important documents you need in order to keep track of your finances or run your business. Whatever the case may be, that data is important and it would be devastating to lose. Hard drives — even SSDs — fail all the time, sometimes even out of the blue. A good backup routine is the most important thing you can do to keep those files safe. …


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Parenting gives you no shortage of things to worry about for your children, and technology is no exception. The digital world is as commonplace at school and daycare as it is at home. Children are alone with technology from a very young age. You’ll want to make sure your children are safe online, aren’t misusing apps, and aren’t making accidental in-app purchases. You’ll also want to make sure your child stays engaged with the world around them. And on top of all that, you don’t want to worry about them breaking an expensive device. …


An exciting update, and the future of the PrivacyTools organization

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I am very excited to introduce Safing ICS Technologies GmbH as the first sponsor of the PrivacyTools project. Safing is developing the Safing Privacy Network (“SPN”, formerly Gate17), a decentralized network designed to protect both connection data and metadata, and focusing on speed and usability.

Safing and its founders share many of the same privacy ideals as our team, and we are very excited to support each other moving forward. You can read more about this sponsorship and what it means to them on the Safing Blog.

“We are delighted to be in a position where we are able to share our resources, and equally enthusiastic that we can start this off by supporting the amazing team behind the PrivacyTools venture.”


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There’s a massive problem in the privacy world. Websites, social media accounts, and other platforms are constantly popping up out of nowhere, telling you to buy The Greatest Service Ever in order to solve all your privacy woes, whatever that may be. These websites often employ marketing teams to make sure their “reviews” are what you see first when you begin your research. …


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Mozilla Firefox is one of the most popular web browsers around, and for good reason. It’s fast, secure, open-source, and it’s backed by an organization that actually respects your privacy. Unlike many other Chrome alternatives and forks, it has a massive development team behind it that publishes new updates on a constant, regular basis. Regular updates doesn’t only mean shiny new features, it means you’ll also receive security updates that will keep you protected as you browse the web.

Because of all of this, we recommend Firefox as our general-purpose browser for most users. …


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So you know what a VPN is, but there are so many options to choose from! Well before we dive into this, let’s get one thing off the bat:

Avoid Free VPNs

Privacy-respecting VPNs can provide their service because you pay them for it. Free VPNs are worse than your ISP when it comes to respecting your privacy, because selling your data is the only way they can make money, whereas an ISP is primarily paid for by you.

If you’re not paying for it, you’re the product.

This isn’t to say all paid VPNs automatically become trustworthy, far from it. In fact many paid VPN providers have been known to or suspected to have sold their users’ data or have done some otherwise shady things with it. Always completely evaluate the VPN provider you choose, rather than just take theirs or anyone else’s word for it. The main takeaway here is that it is impossible to provide a service like a VPN — which requires servers, bandwidth, time, and energy to maintain — for free for thousands of users, without having some sort of other monetization model. …


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A VPN or Virtual Private Network — is a tool that secures your internet connection from attackers on your network. Before I explain how that all works, let’s talk about the internet without them.

Your Internet Service Provider (ISP) can see everything you do online. Well, nearly everything: When websites use HTTPS (or TLS, or SSL. these terms are typically used interchangeably when referring to website encryption), indicated by the padlock in your web browser, your ISP cannot see exactly what you’re doing on the website. So, they usually can’t see what specific pages you look at or what you type in to forms. …

About

Jonah Aragon

I’m an Apple IT professional and online privacy researcher from Minnesota. Featured in Hacker Noon, Medium, PrivacyTools. www.jonaharagon.com

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