Hillary — A Champion for the Voiceless

On September 30, 2014 there were 415,229 children in foster care. In fact, every week roughly 60,000 children are reported abused or neglected. It is difficult to understand the pain a neglected child endures. Besides the cot in the back of the auditorium essentially, you are alone. Unlike sperm doing back-flips in some woman’s fallopian tubes, there are no billion dollar lobbyists working on your behalf. Every Republican ardently fights to protect the unborn. But as soon that child is born, they are on their on.

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Thankfully, we have politicians like Hillary.

No one told Hillary Clinton to improve the foster care system. Let’s face it, orphans are voiceless. They don’t even have parents to fight for them. But Hillary has devoted her life to protecting the voiceless.

If you could remove one ounce of misery from this world, then you have done good.

Whether it be providing clean stoves to women in Africa, denouncing the Chinese government’s forced abortion policies, defending social security against Republican scare tactics Hillary has dedicated her career to helping those that need it most.

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I’m sure most Republicans stopped reading my article after that paragraph.

Hate her all you want, but facts and records don’t lie. She HAS spent her life helping the ignored — the old and the young.

As First Lady, Hillary worked across the aisle with former Republican Minority Whip Tom Delay of Texas and Dave Thomas of Wendy’s, a lifelong Republican.

Together, the three held events to promote support for legislation that would encourage adoptions, provide more aid for foster families, and, most importantly, help foster children find permanent and safe homes, bursting with love.

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The legislation was in two pieces. In 1997, the first one was called the Adoption and Safe Families Act. The legislation increased adoptions by 64 percent by 2002!

Even The Washington Post called the law “the most significant change in federal child-protection policy in almost two decades.”

The second piece of legislation, the Foster Care Independence Act of 1999, was designed for orphans that never find parents. If they are still sitting in that cot in the back of the auditorium when they turn 18, before Hillary’s legislation, they would simply “age out” of the foster care system.

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These children are given a bag of belongings, a slap on the back, and a “best of luck” before stepping out into the world. Not much hope though.

The Foster Care Independence Act, supplies these children with, as President Clinton said, “the tools they need to make the most of their lives.”

These “tools” include access to healthcare, education, housing assistance, and counseling services.

When Hillary started working at the State Department, her crusade for the voiceless continued, and she was able to bring it on to the world stage. She created the first ever special adviser on international children’s issues. This position engages with foreign governments to protect the welfare and interests of children.

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The astonishing aspect of Hillary’s accomplishments, is how far under the radar they are. I only found out about Hillary’s adoption legislation through a video featuring one of the orphans that benefited through Hillary’s legislation.

Shane Salter, was born to a teen mom and grew up in foster care.

“I came into foster care at 4 years old. Aging out of foster care is one of the cruelest things we could do to a child. She asked me to tell my story and she asked me what did I think would have made a difference,” he says. “…Can you imagine from foster care to the White House?”

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What has Donald Trump or Bernie Sanders or for that matter, any politician done for the less fortunate that hold a candle to Hillary’s triumphant accomplishments? You might hate her, but there are a lot of people out there, too young or too old or too suppressed, that Hillary gave a voice to.

Say what you want about her, but if you have a heart, you feel empathy for the less fortunate. Be happy for them that they have Hillary.

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Originally published at Poli(tics) Today.