7 Things You Can Do Instead Of Ripping Apart A Logo Redesign You Didn’t Have The Brief On

An exhaustive compendium of choices.

Wash your hair

While experts say that there’s no consensus on just how often to wash your hair, we can all agree that those who have before live healthier, (probably) more sexually active lives. So give those locks the good stuff!

Learn more about lobsters

It’s common knowledge that lobsters are overgrown underwater spiders. Science won’t argue that one! But did you know that some have gone on to become successful meals? That’s just one of the many facts you could potentially uncover by learning more about lobsters.

Order a ball pit on Amazon

It’s the new, creative workplace that might be sweeping the nation. Who knows. I, at least, haven’t seen anyone doing it — so this could kinda be “your thing”.

Write some Harry Potter fan fiction

Sure, the story may be over for some, but it doesn’t have to be for you! Maybe Harry is in a traveling family band now. Or maybe it’s some sort of Ender’s Game crossover event. Raise your wand and Alohomora your creativity.

Come clean on hating kale

It’s admittedly had a good run, but let’s let 2016 be the year we’re at least honest with ourselves — we’ve stomached it for long enough.

Summon Paimon, Demon King of Hell

He’s got a camel and has a thing for secrets. Why not.

Literally, a whole bunch of other things

There are at least a dozen things we haven’t even touched on yet. Maybe more! But the fact remains, your time might be better spent doing most anything other that isn’t just tearing something apart with hypothetical redesigns and/or lobbing Twitter molotov cocktails. Try reading the Hunger Games backwards! Save a file using JPG-2000! Maybe open Adobe Bridge! The only limit is your imagination!

It’s worth noting here for clarification: Critique isn’t bad. It’s an invaluable tool we have at our disposal working in this industry with others. Having an opinion isn’t either. Your experience and how you feel about something shouldn’t be invalidated. Neither should your expertise. But what is worth digging into is the way we respond to these events. The real value we can offer is in thoughtful, earnest critique that adds to the conversation — rather than tearing down what we didn’t create to show (sometimes quite literally) that we could do better. This is where the real dialogue happens. One that’s far more conducive to efficient critique and leaves room for a conversation as opposed to an airing of grievances.