. Death of an Indolent Salesman

Get as many books on managing for success, have productivity seminars and do all that is advised. That’s fine, but sooner or later opinions will coalesce around this simple truth -that staff at the lowest career level are vital to a company/agency’s economic prosperity, based on their conduct and quality of public interactions.

A true story, succinctly told, might suffice for the picture that’s worth a thousand words. I hope that at least one mind might be changed.

When my friend and I walked into a Florida auto dealership, the young uninterested salesman standing in the lobby offered no greeting. We approached the waxen figure that was him. Dressed in short sleeved white cotton shirt and khaki slacks, he cut a figure of a military guard. The impression based on what might be perceived as his resolve that he shall not be moved to action and that we shall not have whatever is the property he swore to protect with his life. Was he just lazy? Tired? I didn’t think so and my friend concurred.

I imagined what his thoughts were. He might have been observing two wet, feral cats gliding across the polished, checkered, grey and red tiles, toward him. Well, that seemed to be the picture afloat in an idle mind, peeked at through its shutters. We three stood, he at least asked what we were thinking of buying and a few more mundane inquiries. I suppose that the reason he didn’t offer a seat at one of the nearby, available tables, must have been his “why bother” predetermined decision.

The unknown salesman did, however, do us the favour of redirecting my friend and me to any of the several other businesses that sold motor cars. They were clustered on both sides of the street and adjacent for about four to six blocks -various brands on display. Consulting the competition was a walk in the transportation park. Pick one.

The next lot was not as attractive a business as the previous -the one that displayed the waxen salesman. No problem with that. We were looking to purchase a car, not real estate. We tried there.

Three men, we correctly assumed were sales agents sat casually at a table off to our right. Seeing our entry, they appeared to quickly settle who’s-up-next or who’s best able to make a sale. The selected wasted no time. His smile indicated openness, he asked questions about what we expected then invited us to look around the lot; to take all the time needed; that he would check with us intermittently. This was a motivated employee.

In two hours my very own two door, black mustang with scarlet bucket seats was delivered as requested, to my home.

Today, I wondered about what is foremost in a manager’s mind when making a decision to hire someone, particularly if the position requires contact with potential customers/stakeholders. -in writing, by phone and most of all making the first face to face engagement.

Indolent staff in the lobby is worse than none. Poorly trained staff affect an enterprise’s reputation and longevity. An employee’s economic death wish, ought not to be the establishment’s demise. Think of this: one wax figure caused the dealership thirty thousand dollars in about four minutes. Foster that ethos of disregard, and soon the enterprise will be interred beside the unknown, unwilling salesman. Should that occur, may they all rest in peace.

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. Death of an Indolent Salesman

Get as many books on managing for success, have productivity seminars and do all that is advised. That’s fine, but sooner or later opinions will coalesce around this simple truth -that staff at the lowest career level are vital to a company/agency’s economic prosperity, based on their conduct and quality of public interactions.

A true story, succinctly told, might suffice for the picture that’s worth a thousand words. I hope that at least one mind might be changed.

When my friend and I walked into a Florida auto dealership, the young uninterested salesman standing in the lobby offered no greeting. We approached the waxen figure that was him. Dressed in short sleeved white cotton shirt and khaki slacks, he cut a figure of a military guard. The impression based on what might be perceived as his resolve that he shall not be moved to action and that we shall not have whatever is the property he swore to protect with his life. Was he just lazy? Tired? I didn’t think so and my friend concurred.

I imagined what his thoughts were. He might have been observing two wet, feral cats gliding across the polished, checkered, grey and red tiles, toward him. Well, that seemed to be the picture afloat in an idle mind, peeked at through its shutters. We three stood, he at least asked what we were thinking of buying and a few more mundane inquiries. I suppose that the reason he didn’t offer a seat at one of the nearby, available tables, must have been his “why bother” predetermined decision.

The unknown salesman did, however, do us the favour of redirecting my friend and me to any of the several other businesses that sold motor cars. They were clustered on both sides of the street and adjacent for about four to six blocks -various brands on display. Consulting the competition was a walk in the transportation park. Pick one.

The next lot was not as attractive a business as the previous -the one that displayed the waxen salesman. No problem with that. We were looking to purchase a car, not real estate. We tried there.

Three men, we correctly assumed were sales agents sat casually at a table off to our right. Seeing our entry, they appeared to quickly settle who’s-up-next or who’s best able to make a sale. The selected wasted no time. His smile indicated openness, he asked questions about what we expected then invited us to look around the lot; to take all the time needed; that he would check with us intermittently. This was a motivated employee.

In two hours my very own two door, black mustang with scarlet bucket seats was delivered as requested, to my home.

Today, I wondered about what is foremost in a manager’s mind when making a decision to hire someone, particularly if the position requires contact with potential customers/stakeholders. -in writing, by phone and most of all making the first face to face engagement.

Indolent staff in the lobby is worse than none. Poorly trained staff affect an enterprise’s reputation and longevity. An employee’s economic death wish, ought not to be the establishment’s demise. Think of this: one wax figure caused the dealership thirty thousand dollars in about four minutes. Foster that ethos of disregard, and soon the enterprise will be interred beside the unknown, unwilling salesman. Should that occur, may they all rest in peace.