NIH workshop will shine light on real-world pragmatic trials

Kaiser Permanente Washington President Susan Mullaney is among health leaders discussing unique research opportunities in large integrated systems

Kaiser Permanente Washington President Susan Mullaney, MHA

How can we bridge gaps between clinical evidence, practice, and policy? That’s the question researchers and their health system partners will address in a May 24 workshop sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH): “Pragmatic Clinical Trials: Unique Opportunities for Disseminating, Implementing, and Sustaining Evidence-Based Practices into Clinical Care.”

As the workshop website explains, “pragmatic trials are distinct from more traditional clinical trials as they are designed to assess the impact of interventions delivered in usual or real-world conditions.”

The workshop is based on the lessons learned from nine pragmatic trials initiated through the NIH Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory, which is funded by the NIH Common Fund. Topics addressed included suicide prevention, colorectal cancer screening, care for back pain, advanced care planning, reducing hospital infections, and more.

Speakers for the workshop will include academic researchers and health system partners from across the country and other leaders from Kaiser Permanente, including:

  • Kaiser Permanente Washington President Susan Mullaney, MHA;
  • Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (KPWHRI) Senior Investigator Gregory Simon, MD, MPH;
  • Kaiser Permanente Northwest’s Senior Investigators Gloria Coronado, PhD, and
  • Lynn DeBar, PhD, MPH.

Eric B. Larson, MD, MPH, vice president for research and health care innovation for Kaiser Permanente Washington and executive director of KPWHRI, will serve as a moderator and leads the team that organized the NIH workshop with collaboration from Catherine Meyers, MD and others from the NIH, and Leah Tuzzio, MPH and James Fraser from KPWHRI and others from Duke University’s Clinical Research Institute.

The free workshop will be held on Wednesday, May 24 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time at NIH in Bethesda, Maryland. It will also be videocast online. You can register here.