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In its time, the show was praiseworthy, and its fictional newsroom was more inclusive than many actual newsrooms at the time. The MTM newsroom had a woman and an African America man BEFORE the FCC mandated more representation in local news. The characters had a casual acceptance of homosexuality (a friend of Phyllis; she didn’t know he was gay but when she found out didn’t care). Mary’s best friend was Jewish.

I’m not really sure what “white feminism” has to do with any of this. The feminism of the era assumed that everyone was of the same class/background (upper middle class white women who wanted to, but didn’t need to, work. Think Betty Friedan, who was an upper class NYC housewife while writing “The Feminine Mystique). In the early 1970s feminist movement, issues of class, and that women might need to work were a form of intersectionality and different from the second wave feminist discussion of the time. The developments then led to third (reclaiming power in traditional feminine spheres, better integration of race and class issues), and now fourth wave feminism (more complicated intersectionality).

Would the show look or act the same if it were made today? Of course not. But that doesn’t diminish its trailblazing role in the era in which it was made.

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