Image for post
Image for post

Business Management student Carly McDonald discusses what it’s like to study at Keele as a mature student.

Going straight from school or college to university is the norm but imagine being in a full-time, well-paid job and making the decision to leave that and become a student.

I did go to university when I left school after doing my A levels and I hated every single second of it, so why on earth did I decide I wanted to return 5 years later?


Image for post
Image for post

Harry Upton, Research Assistant from Keele’s School of Law, discusses why the end of the pandemic is in sight, but only for the wealthiest countries.

Throughout November, the world saw three significant announcements from pharmaceutical companies leading the race to develop a vaccine for COVID-19. News that the BioNTech-Pfizer vaccine was 95% effective during its Phase III clinical trials was followed closely by similar announcements by Moderna and AstraZeneca. For the first time, it looked as though the end of the pandemic was actually in sight.

Unfortunately, this is not a universal truth. While the news may well represent the beginning of the end of this pandemic in some countries, the reality is that many developing countries are unlikely to see substantial quantities of vaccine arriving within their borders anything like as soon as their wealthier counterparts. …


Image for post
Image for post

Dr Jacco van Loon writes for The Conversation UK’s “Curious Kids” series.

If the Earth turns all the time, then why isn’t the door where the stairs are sometimes? — Katie, aged six, Saltburn-by-the-Sea, UK

The Earth is always spinning. Every day, you are turned upside down and back again. You will also probably have travelled thousands of kilometres and as much as 40,000 kilometres if you live near the equator.

At the equator, the Earth is spinning at about 1675 kilometres per hour — much faster than an aeroplane. But if you stand on the North Pole or on the South Pole, then all you’ll do is turn around on the spot. This is the point around which the Earth spins. …


Image for post
Image for post

Rachel Lee, Lecturer in Marketing from Keele Business School, discusses the impact of lockdowns on UK retailers.

As yet another period of national lockdown has hit retailers in the most vital spending period of the year, it runs the risk of creating further polarisation in an already fragile and fragmented sector. It is all to play for in the last quarter of 2020 as retailers battle to attract customers attention to create a Christmas to remember, but how will this impact retailers up and down the United Kingdom?

Another high street hiatus

On Thursday 5th November 2020, non-essential retailers were once again told to shut their doors to the general public during one of the most important spending quarters of the year. Whilst this has implications for all retailers, there is perhaps a more significant impact for specialist independent retailers on the local high street. Last year had already presented a challenge with physical store retail sales in decline. With the enforced closure of specialist non-essential retailers this November, the competitive playing field of the retail industry has been further shaken for Christmas 2020. …


Image for post
Image for post
Alexei Nikolsky/Sputnik/Kremlin

Dr Xuebing Cao from Keele Business School writes for The Conversation.

One thing the coronavirus pandemic has meant for world leaders is that it has simplified their international calendars somewhat. Take the week ending November 22: Russia hosted the BRICS summit on Tuesday November 17, Malaysia held the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation meeting on Friday November 20 and the weekend of November 21 and 22 was booked in for the G20 summit in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Rather than having to board flights and live out of suitcases, leaders had to attend via video link. …


Image for post
Image for post

Professor Ghulam Sorwar from Keele Business School writes for The Conversation

It was the Bank of Japan which first embarked on the experiment known as quantitative easing, or QE, in order to try and stimulate the Japanese economy out of its period of very low growth known as the “lost decade” between 1991 and 2001. Since the global financial crisis and recession of 2007–2009, quantitative easing has been a mainstay of western governments’ monetary policies aimed at stabilising the economy.

However, central banks have spent trillions on QE since in the years since — £895 billion in the UK alone — and as the Bank of England launches a new £150 billion stimulus package there are questions as to whether QE can provide the economic stability governments and markets are hoping for in the face of economic paralysis caused by the pandemic. …


Image for post
Image for post
Yuliya Yesina / shutterstock

Dr Sharon George from Keele’s School of Geography, Geology and the Environment writes for The Conversation

Over the summer, eating outdoors was a pleasant way to socialise more safely at pubs, restaurants and in gardens. But as temperatures drop and covid restrictions remain in place, socialising outdoors becomes more tricky (even after lockdown).

Regular patio heaters are hugely inefficient for use outdoors since so much of the heat they generate is simply lost as there are no walls and ceilings to hold it in. So how can we keep everyone warm outside — without generating a huge carbon footprint?

Fire is simple, but…

The simplest outdoor heating option is a firepit or a log burner. These are widely popular but can significantly add to air pollution. How much heat is produced can also vary depending on how concentrated the energy is in the fuel and, for wood fires, how much water is in the wood. …


Image for post
Image for post
An artist’s impression of a gravitational micro-lensing event by a free-floating planet. JanSkowron/Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw.

Dr Jacco van Loon, Director of the Keele Observatory, writes for The Conversation

Most known planets orbit a star. These planets, including Earth, benefit from the star’s warmth and light. And it is the light emitted from these stars which makes it possible for us to see them. But there are also “invisible” planets, hidden from our gaze, which float, abandoned, through the cosmos. These dark, lonely worlds have no star to orbit, no light in which to bask, no warmth to be radiated by. …


Image for post
Image for post
Adina Lawrence, Strong, British & Black exhibition

By Hinna Sheikh, Race Equality Officer at Keele University and Aysha Panter, Student Engagement Coordinator at Keele SU.

As many of you know, October marks the celebration of Black History Month in the UK. It’s a month to reflect on the numerous achievements of Black communities in the UK and celebrate their undervalued contribution. As we approach the end of Black History Month, Keele SU’s Student Engagement Coordinator, Aysha Panter, and the University’s Race Equality Officer, Hinna Sheikh, share their reflections on Black History Month at Keele.

This year many of Keele’s Black History Month events have taken a different format due to the ongoing pandemic. Despite these challenges, Keele University, the Students’ Union, the KPA and various student groups have made this one of Keele’s most vibrant Black History Months. We want to thank everyone who took the time to organise and take part in events! …


Image for post
Image for post

Dr Gordon Dent from Keele’s School of Pharmacy and Bioengineering writes for The Conversation.

Donald Trump’s brief stay in hospital in early October raised awareness — once again — of the variety of treatments being investigated for COVID-19.

Some therapies the president received have been on the radar for a long time, others are new to the list of potential treatments. Notably, drugs such as hydroxychloroquine that were once widely touted as a treatment weren’t used, having been shown to be ineffective.

Thanks to the Recovery trial, based at Oxford University, we’re finding out more all the time about which therapies are useful. So, while the below won’t be the definitive answer on how to treat COVID-19, nine months into the pandemic, this is what we know so far about what works. …

About

Keele University

№1 in England for Student Satisfaction (NSS, broad-based) and TEF Gold - it's the #KeeleDifference. Britain's largest single-site campus. Many squirrels.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store