Talk is Cheap, You’ve Got to Put Out

Folks, I write a lot about productivity, how to be better at certain things, that whole thing. I even have a separate site devoted to just that!

And that’s all great (at least I think it is). But as the person giving advice and hoping to add some small bit of value into people’s daily lives, it all means absolutely nothing if I can’t prove that I’m implementing as many of these tips and best practices into my own life as possible. And that’s not easy.

It’s great to say follow these 8 habits to be more productive, but it would only make me look bad to not actively be heeding my own advice. I’d just be blowing smoke!

Talk is cheap. It’s so cheap that everyone can do it! Which makes it completely worthless by itself. You’ve got to be able to back it up.

You and I and anyone else can say anything we want about any situation. We can talk in ideals and embellished fantasies. We can make commitments and promises. We can say whatever the other person wants to hear, but at the end of the day it means nothing unless we actually do something about it and act on what we’ve said.

We’ve all lied our way into and out of a thousand situations. Shoot, my honors thesis was on the neuro/psych/sociology of deception! Call me jaded, but I can never quite accept what someone says — be it a commitment to do X or an apology for Y — until I’ve seen them follow through with it. And I’d be willing to bet I’m not the only person that feels this way.

We all know that people, ourselves included, can say whatever they want to make the best of any situation — on the surface. Whether we acknowledge it or not, we all also understand how important it is to put our money where our mouth is.

I’m sure I’ve royally ticked a bunch of people off for seeming hostile or unsympathetic by brushing off what they have to say. And I’m okay with that! Call me rude if you want, but I’m not going to get worked up about anything short of change.

For me in particular, blogging and giving tips to help others succeed means absolutely nothing unless I’m constantly working to improve and succeed myself. I fail at this daily, but that need to prove myself is a large part of why I have so many goals this year, like publishing 100,000 words around my 9–5, finishing two books, creating a revenue-producing website, reading 30 books, among others.

If I’m not practicing what I preach, I might as well be a liar. And nobody likes a liar.

We all have something or some area in our lives where we say a bunch of things that sound great in the moment, but then struggle to back it up. Where could you improve?

What advice would you give to a friend in any given situation? Would you actually follow your own advice? And if you’d try to follow it, would you be able to keep going when it gets difficult?

It’s certainly not easy to listen to your own advice all the time. But you’ve got to be able to put out if want people to listen to you, and especially if you yourself want to be better.

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Originally published at kenneticexpression.com on January 10, 2016.