My Hyland Internship

Over this past summer, I had the fortunate opportunity to intern with Hyland, creator of OnBase. Specializing in its ECM software, Hyland is located a bit west of Cleveland in the wonderful city of Westlake.

Cleveland isn’t exactly known as a popular “tech hub” throughout the United States. It’s not Silicon Valley, New York, or Seattle. I’m pretty sure Columbus has been gaining a lot more reputation than Cleveland as being a place for developers to head to. Hyland, however, is special: it’s a large tech company in Cleveland that continues to grow and be a great place for its employees. Slides, an arcade, great cafeterias, tennis courts, and campus bikes are a few of the flashy perks I enjoyed. I remember visiting Hyland a few years ago — they only had one building then. Their campus now contains three.

Hyland’s got everything: developers, marketers, sales, consultants, and more. I interned within Hyland’s Healthcare Services department. These are the guys and gals that work with Hyland’s healthcare clients to come up with their OnBase solution. I, however, worked as an internal developer for services, creating tools to help the department out. Being able to develop without the constraints of a formal development department behind my back was nice — I was able to quickly develop tools, and I had the flexibility to do it however I thought was best. It was a refreshing experience, that also provided me with the consideration that there are some awesome job opportunities out there beyond just being a developer (including consulting).

At some point, I did get the welcome surprise of being able to shadow a business trip to Oklahoma City. I wrote a piece about it that got published in the company’s OnBase Blog — check it out here for a more in-depth view of my experience and thoughts!

That’s all I’m going to cover for now; if anyone I know is interested in learning more about interning with Hyland, feel free to reach out to me!


Originally published at blog.kevinpayravi.com on August 28, 2015.

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