Healthy Holidays with Komen CSNJ: Yummy Granola Bar Recipe

Everyone loves the classic granola bar. It’s quick, easy, and a super filling snack, but are granola bars really as healthy as most major granola bar companies claim? You open the wrapper to your favorite granola bar, take a bite, and suddenly see the high sugar content and calorie count on the back. Your so called “healthy snack” isn’t so healthy anymore.

What is the solution to this granola bar tragedy? It’s very simple, make your very own homemade granola bars! The perks to making your own granola bars are endless. Not only can you monitor exactly what will be going into your body, but it also allows for more portion control and customization. This recipe is super easy, only needs 5 ingredients, and does not require any baking for the delicious finished product.

Here at Susan G. Komen Central and South Jersey, we encourage everyone to enjoy a healthy lifestyle. A healthy diet promotes overall health and well-being, allowing you to be the best version of yourself that you can be! Have fun whipping up this yummy recipe:

Ingredients

  • 2 cups of organic oats
  • 1 cup of all natural organic peanut butter/almond butter
  • ½ cup of unsalted chopped almonds
  • ½ cup of organic semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • ¼ cup of agave nectar

Steps

  1. Mix the oats, peanut butter, chocolate chips, almonds, and agave nectar in a bowl.
  2. Cover an 8x8 pan with parchment paper. Make sure there is extra parchment paper that folds over the edges of the pan.
  3. Place the pan into the refrigerator for 45 minutes
  4. When ready to eat, cut the granola into small rectangles or whatever size desired.

Feel free to add any other ingredients in your granola mix such as dried apricots, dates, cranberries, or even different types of nuts for more customization.

It is super important to know exactly what goes into your favorite foods. Switching to homemade granola bars is a healthy and smart way to eat clean and take control of your diet.

So, indulge and dig in!


Written by: Paige Harootunian, Komen CSNJ Intern

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