Oh, Kym. The Soviets and Communist China killed millions of their own through failed collective…
Pauly B
1

Communism and all forms of collective policies certainly did kill millions. That is not the debate. Killing more innocents because of the disgusting actions of despots and state agents does not free the innocent.

To assume that Japan and Germany turned out well economically after the war is thanks to the Marshall plans and US carpet bombing is most daft. It ignores both cultures and nations economic and social nuances pre war and the many efforts to liberalise their own economies despite policies like the Marshall plan, debt and military aid. It is far more complicated. To assume that success for these nations came about thanks to US military presence and early economic lending, is self serving and very American self perceived. If that is the case then why were other recipients of such aid not also as successful as Germany and Japan.

Further more this logic would suggest that perhaps Chicago and Detroit would benefit from mass bombing only to be followed up by economic ‘bail outs’ in order to help rebuild those US cities-regions to what they once were. Millions dead be damned.

As a non American, as I look across at the USA I see one monolith of central planning that indulges in protectionism, over regulation, excessive debt, military adventures abroad and confusion between free market rhetoric vs regulatory practices. I would never hope to suggest that should the US Federal monolith expand more of its central planning and more Americans suffer and die at the hands of their own constrictive regulations and directly by Federal and State ‘agents’ that the answer would be to drop the ‘bomb’ or bombs across the continent.

That would be daft and sick. Murder is Murder regardless of desired outcomes or simplistic myths that come from a publicly funded American education system that teaches less about historical facts and complexities and more about national feelings and mythos.

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