Using the Logic of Natural English Grammar- Participles

This is a follow-up to “Learning the Logic of Natural English Grammar (Parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)”

You can see “Present Participle” and “Past Participle” in all modern dictionaries. Unfortunately, I can neither understand nor explain why they use these incorrect names… But I can show you how the dictionaries contradict themselves:

Nonfinite verbs found in English typically are infinitives, participles and gerunds. Nonfinite verb

Nonfinite — a nonfinite verb form or clause does not show a particular tense, person, or number nonfinite adjective — Definition, pictures, pronunciation and usage notes

Tense — any of the forms of a verb that may be used to show the time of the action or state expressed by the verb tense noun — Definition, pictures, pronunciation and usage notes

Nonfinite = Participles

Nonfinite = No Tense = No Time >> > Participles = No Time

The question is: How can Participle be “Present” or “Past”?!!!

English Participle can be neitherpresentnorpast”.
It is clearly understood from what English grammar logic shows:

Time (Present/Past/Future) is used to show a Mood and that this word/construction (= formula) describes a Primary action (= Predicate) in the Sentence;

Verbals (Participle, Infinitive, Gerund) are used to show that this word/construction (= formula) describes a Secondary action in the Sentence.

There are only eight formulas > each name already shows the two most important features > Voice Aspect > with these two features we already have the formula we need to describe the situation > only after that, we can add the third feature to the name > it can be EITHERPresent/PastORParticiple” (= carrying in themselves the same functionality idea, they cannot be used both in one and the same name).

e.g. (Present Participle or Active Participle - ?)
We saw him coming over the little field opposite the house where he lived.

saw Active Simple Past (Past is used to show that the Sentence is Indicative mood, and saw (= formula) describes a Primary action (= predicate) in the Sentence)

lived — Active Simple Past (Past is used to show that the Sentence is Indicative mood, and lived (= formula) describes a Primary action (= predicate) in the Sentence)

COMING— Active Simple Participle (Participle is used to show that coming (= formula) describes a Secondary action in the Sentence). BTW, can anyone see any “PRESENT” in this sentence?!!!

Present Participle or Active Participle (?) — it is up to you to decide which one seems more logical (= helpful in the process of learning). https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-present-participle

e.g. (Past Participle or Passive Participle - ?)
(1) My wife called and asked me to pick up some dinner on the way home.

called, asked — Active Simple Past (Past is used to show that the Sentence is Indicative mood, and asked (= formula) describes a Primary action (= predicate) in the Sentence)

to pick (up) — Active Simple Infinitive (Infinitive is used to show that to pick (up) (= formula) describes a Secondary action in the Sentence).

(2) Google will not share records with anyone unless asked to do so by the user.

will (not) share — Active Simple Future (Future is used to show that the Sentence is Indicative mood, and will (not) share (= formula) describes a Primary action (= predicate) in the Sentence)

asked — Passive Simple Participle (Participle is used to show that asked (= formula) describes a Secondary action in the Sentence). BTW, can anyone see any “PAST” in this sentence?!!!

to do — Active Simple Infinitive (Infinitive is used to show that to do (= formula) describes a Secondary action in the Sentence). https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-past-participle

“…The alien term displaced Voice in the very core of the English Verb Grammar. To secure it against being discovered (= to split up all English verb forms into two separate groups), the terms tensed and non-tensed verbs were invented to be used instead of verbs and verbals, and then camouflaged with the names finite and non-finite verbs.” Learning the Logic of English Grammar-Part 2

In the 2002 revision of the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, finite and non-finite verbs were renamed primary and secondary verbs. Primary & Secondary Verb Forms

Robin Turner “Logically, the names should be Active Participle and Passive Participle.” I’ve been saying that for years!

There are also two good neutral terms: Participle I and Participle II.