Pop Art Portraits of Influential Latinos in the U.S.

Adding final touches. Photo by Kylie Keune

Instagram @ LettuceBFriendz

email: LettuceBFriendz@gmail.com

I am a child of immigrants who came to this country undocumented, poor, illiterate, and without speaking English. My parents are the most honest, hardworking, and selfless people I have ever met. They were lucky enough to have received the 1986 amnesty and one generation later, I, their daughter, am a lawyer, fully bilingual in English and Spanish, proficient in German, and conversational in Portuguese. My response to the xenophobic hostility directed at people like my parents is channeled through this collection — a series of oil on canvas pop art portraits of influential Latinos in the U.S. The “pop” in pop art means popular culture. While the subjects of my portraits are not a part of the mainstream culture they should be.

My hope is that these portraits will be used for education, to inspire the youth, and build cross cultural understanding.

This collection will be displayed at Lezo’s Taqueria in Washington, DC during the month of Hispanic Heritage (September 20-October 15).

I chose to display this collection at Lezo’s Taqueria because not only is Dona Rosa the sweetest woman ever, but she is a shining example of what it means to be an immigrant in the U.S. and her business is a fine example of the American Dream. To view the finished portraits visit Lezo’s Taqueria. #tacotrucksoneverycorner #lettucebfriendz

Ellen Ochoa, First Latina in Space! 3ft x 3 ft.Photo by Kylie Keune. Unfinished here.

Cesar Chavez, leader of Farm Worker’s Union. 3ft x 3 ft. Photo by Kylie Keune. Here unfinished.

Cesar Chavez, leader of Farm Worker’s Union. 3ft x 3 ft. Photo by Pablo Manriquez.

Junot Diaz, Author. 3ft x 3 ft. Photo by Kylie Keune. Here unfinished.

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