Picture of the Week: Visualizing Ocean Asteroid Impact

Scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory are using high performance computing to investigate how an asteroid’s kinetic energy is transferred to the atmosphere and ocean.

An asteroid splashing down in one of Earth’s oceans could inject billions of tons of water into the atmosphere, but the risk of a catastrophic tsunami is actually relatively small. Scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory are using high performance computing to investigate how an asteroid’s kinetic energy is transferred to the atmosphere and ocean. These studies help scientists understand the consequences of asteroid impacts and assist NASA’s Office of Planetary Defense in deciding how to best track near-Earth objects (NEOs).

For their work on this project, Los Alamos’ Data Science at Scale Team won the Best Visualization and Data Analytics Showcase award at Supercomputing 2016 for their video “Visualization and Analysis of Threats from Asteroid Ocean Impacts.” This is the second consecutive year that Los Alamos’ Data Science at Scale Team has won this award.

Watch the award winning video here at the Los Alamos’ Data Science at Scale Team’s website.

Or watch here:

Originally published at www.lanl.gov.

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