Written by Nana Darkoa Sekyiamah

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We are delighted to share that on the 12th of June 2020, we will be launching a series of online conversations with African Feminist Communicators That We Love.

Join these conversations to learn more about the ways in which African feminists are using a wide range of communication tools to highlight key causes and issues. Get to know African feminist communicators, their work, and what motivates them to do what they do.

Our guest for June is Vickie Remoe. She is the Chief Content Marketing Officer at VR&C Marketing Company where she develops communications and media strategies for entrepreneurs, policymakers and project leaders in Ghana, Sierra Leone, Liberia and beyond. …


Written by Fatima B.Derby

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Communications goals are the desired results and outcomes that an organization intends to achieve with its communication strategy within a given time-frame. External communication goals provide a framework with which you interact with your organization’s stakeholders. For women’s rights organizations working to defend and advance the rights of women and girls and to change harmful thoughts and ideas about women and girls; communication goals are an effective way of achieving this purpose.

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In setting communications goals for your organization, you need to first identify your target audience and what you hope to achieve by your interaction with them. …


A Recap

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On Saturday, 31st August 2019, MAKEDA PR and Dr. Anu Taranath of the University of Washington hosted a conversation on feminism, sexuality and gender representation in Ghana particularly in media spaces. The conversation dubbed ‘Waist and Power’: A Conversation on Sexualities, Masculinities and Representation in Ghana” was held at the Resource Centre of AWDF House.

The event provided a forum for University of Washington students to interact with and learn from Ghanaian feminists and activists and offered insight into issues surrounding the representation of women in pop culture, alongside young feminist and LGBT organising in Accra.

The program opened with an icebreaker that facilitated open communication among participants about sex and relationships in a safe, fun, and relaxed environment. The conversation then continued with the screening of a selection of music videos from Ghana and a subsequent group discussion reflecting on LGBT issues, sexuality, desire, mental health, and representation. In the second segment, the panel addressed feminist activism in traditional media and online and reflected on some of the successes and challenges of such work and the importance of personal support systems and boundaries for activists. Finally, the panelists discussed the latest movements in young feminist and LGBT organising in Ghana and the importance of intersectionality and intergenerational communication and cooperation in feminist activism. …


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Media and art spaces in Ghana are dominated by cishet masculinity, and women are not often well-represented within these spaces. Women and non-binary people are generally held to different standards of creativity and artistic expression as opposed to their male counterparts. In light of this phenomenon, MAKEDA PR and Anu Taranath of University of Washington is excited to present ‘Waist and Power’: A Conversation on Sexualities, Masculinities and Representation in Ghana. The event will take place at AWDF House, Justice Sarkodee Addo Avenue, East Legon on 31st August, 2019 at 3:00 PM.

The event will feature music video screenings, art exhibitions and panel discussions to address issues of feminism, gender and sexuality, desire, representation, LGBTQ issues and human rights, as well as mental health especially as pertains to students. Panelists for the conversation include; Nana Ama Agyemang Asante, Eli Tetteh, Nana Darkoa Sekyiamah, Suhaidatu Dramani, Fatima Derby and Anu Taranath. …


Written by Fatima B.Derby

The idea that feminism and women’s liberation actions are un-African is a gross erasure of our foremothers and their tremendous contribution to the development of our cultures and societies today. Feminism is not foreign to Africa. The concept of feminism has existed in Africa long before the word féminisme (feminine + ism) was coined in 1837 by French philosopher, Charles Fourier. For centuries, African women have been resisting patriarchy and inequality while fighting for social inclusion and justice.

“African women have always found ways of resisting patriarchy through manipulating popular ideas of motherhood, or religion, or labour.” …


Written by Fatima B. Derby

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Image via LSherie Alert, LLC

For non-profit organizations and human rights defenders working to address systemic injustice and inequality and effect social change, communication is key to achieving this goal. One of the prime ways by which this change can be achieved is through advocacy campaigns.

An advocacy campaign is a set of strategic actions and activities carried out over a period of time to create support for social policy or ensure some kind of social change. An effective advocacy campaign should incorporate an integrated communication approach that includes print, multimedia and interactive content that is appealing and engaging to all stakeholders involved. …


Written by Fatima B.Derby

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Female protester at The Total Shutdown in South Africa

From the mid-19th century to date, feminist ideology and philosophy have changed over time, creating what is referred to as waves of feminism. In the digital age, feminist activists employ digital tools to magnify activism and women’s liberation efforts. Feminists throughout history have used different tools and resources to advocate for change. …


Written by Fatima B. Derby

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Image via https://digitalmarketinglight.com/

Content is any valuable information or experience(s) that an individual or organisation shares to catch the attention of a target audience and to interact with them. In the fast-paced world of digital technology, the kind of content you share determines the level of engagement that you receive. It is therefore important to consider content when you’re creating and implementing a digital strategy for your organisation. In designing a social media content strategy, we recommend these steps for non-profit organisations to follow:

1. Planning

The first thing to do when planning your content is to conceptualize what your organization’s identity is, what your NGO’s mission and values are and what kind of voice you want to have online. This will inform the kind of content that you produce and how you distribute it. …


Written by Fatima B. Derby

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Image via https://www.freepik.com/

A key objective of NGO communication is to send out information and messages about your work and the impact you are making in the community. These are what keep people interested in you and invested in the work that you do.

A communications plan is a strategic plan to send out messages and information about your work to your organization’s stakeholders such as donors, media, board members, recipients, volunteers and so on through multiple channels. Here are 5 reasons why your NGO needs a strategic communication plan:

1. To Clarify Your Purpose and Objectives

When you’re undertaking a journey, you map out a route with directions to your destination. Think of your destination as your NGO’s vision. Your communication plan is the route that will help you to meet your NGO goals. …

About

MAKEDA PR

MAKEDA PR is a Communications, PR and Events company that specializes in offering bespoke services to clients in the Arts and Civil Society Spaces.

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