Create like no one knows your name
Jonas Ellison
43731

While I was in university, I always wrote my assignments, from the perspective that I was writing for myself. I was interested in honestly presenting my views and I was not interested in repeating a professor’s lectures. I discerned, through this scary process, that most professors were interested in well-researched creative writing.

I would hand in my assignments with fear and trepidation and be rewarded with very high marks. This taught me, professors know what they know and they are not all that interested in hearing it regurgitated. Most professors want responses indicating that the class material has been thoroughly understood, that the student has well documented his or her research and that the student knows enough about the subject matter to have his or her own opinion. Following this method, I rewarded professors by showing that they had actually taught something.

I think that creative, well-engaged writers, always write as though “no one knows their names.” People who write for “fame” seem untrustworthy to me and I am not interested in what they might have to say.

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.