30 seconds interview: Chain of Flowers

Post-punk five-piece Chain of Flowers have been kicking up a fuss in their home town of Cardiff since 2012.

Their murky sound seems to rise from the chaos and calamity of messy nights out alongside time spent in absorbing the back catalogues of Joy Division and Eagulls.

It’s a visceral mix that’s probably best consumed live through a meaty PA and a sticky dancefloor… No wonder they’ve been picked up to open for The Fall, Chameleons, Ceremony, A Place To Bury Strangers and Eagulls over the last four years.

Following a successful run around the US last autumn ahead of the release of their self-titled debut LP, which landed in October, the band are packing their bags again for SXSW 2017.

Their trip has been made possible through support from the PRS Foundation’s International Showcase Fund, and the band tell us they’re determined ‘remain upright’ over the week of intense live shows and partying.

Here, singer Joshua Smith gives us the skinny on their sound…

We first started making music because…
 Gravity is a brilliant thing, or at least most of the time.

We have been making music since…
 Collectively, it’s been a while. Most of us made music together in different forms prior to this band starting out.

Our music is…
 Eternal.

You’ll like our music if you listen to…
 The voices when the lights go out.

Our favourite venue is…
 The Brudenell in Leeds.

Music is important because…
 It can understand and swallow you.

Our biggest inspiration is…
 The conveyor belt and landfill indie bands.

To try us out, listen to our song…
 Crisis.

If we weren’t making music we’d be…
 Struggling, elsewhere.

At SXSW 2017 we’ll be mostly…
 Playing a lot of shows and trying to remain upright whilst doing so.

Tour dates
 24 April — Leeds, Brudenell Games Room
 25 April — Manchester, The Castle
 26 April — Birmingham, Hare & Hounds 2
 28 April — Bristol, The Louisiana
 29 April — Southampton, The Joiners
 30 April — Brighton, The Hope & Ruin
 1 May — London, The Lock Tavern

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