XSoul XM8 Predator Gaming Mouse REVIEW

A decent mouse that works well but doesn’t bring anything new to the table

The XSoul Gaming mouse has some of the visual charms of a more expensive mouse, but without an extraordinary price tag. A long braided cable seems to be the standard for most mice that are branded as “gaming” hardware, and I agree with this standard. Braided cables tend to have less friction when bundled up which helps avoid tangles. This mouse is designed with a “floating-assembly” or “exposed mechanics” look that brings to mind some of the more expensive Corsair Sabre or Mad Catz R.A.T series of mice. At first glance, that is. A second look at the mouse reveals the cost cutting at work for XM8: plastic divots cut to look like a screw or bolt and an exposed piece of plastic that is painted to resemble a hinged lower mouse panel. On a more positive note, the aesthetics of the XM8 are helped by a bit of colored LED flair and a pair of replaceable back panels for the unit. These panels offer a different angle to allow the mouse to fit differently into the user’s hand. This feature is not new, but uncommon enough that I feel it deserves a positive mention.

The mouse has four separate DPI settings that can be adjusted with the press of a button. Each of these separate “stops” can be adjusted to the user’s preference in DPI in order to have precise control over control sensitivity. The XM8 defaults to a different color change at each “stop” to correspond to each new DPI setting, but this can be overridden by the device software. The available color changes are very configurable, though there doesn’t appear to be a way to adjust ONLY the color of the mouse at the touch of a button, at least not without cycling to the next DPI setting as noted above.

Speaking of buttons, the XM8 brings seven buttons to the table (counting the clickable mouse wheel) with each one configurable to a single action or a set of mouse/keyboard macros. In a bit of added freedom, certain button functionality can be changed completely such as dropping any type of DPI setting in order to gain an extra action button for gaming.

Unfortunately, no amount of software configuration can overcome what I feel to be a very awkward “button 6”. Three buttons are placed next to the thumb rest section of the mouse including a square-ish “button 6” that sits about a half-inch forward of the natural resting position of my thumb. During my testing of the XM8, I was unable to place the mouse in a comfortable fashion that also allowed me to reach all of the available buttons at once. It is possible that a user with a larger hand may not have a problem with this so allow me to suffix this paragraph with a well-worn “your mileage may vary.”

The manufacturer claims that the mouse has additional weights added to the mouse, but the mouse did not appear to feel appreciably heavier or lighter than other mice I have used in the past. For reference, I compared this mouse weight to a Razer Lachesis, a JamesDonkey Model 112, and my current “daily”, the Tesoro Thyrsus. The easiest difference in weight was the JamesDonkey and the XM8, but the difference felt minimal.

Overall, the XSoul XM8 is a decent replacement mouse. It has features that easily justify the low price tag, and the mouse works well enough to save the day should a LAN-party disaster befall your AAA Hardcore Gaming Mouse. XSoul, if you’re listening, readjust the thumb button and tighten up the physical design and this mouse should easily sell for more than you are currently asking for.

Originally published at macsources.com on August 16, 2016.

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