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László Moholy-Nagy July 20, 1895 — November 24, 1946 was a “utopian artist who believed that art could work hand in hand with technology for the betterment of humanity.”

Moholy-Nagy was born László Weisz in Bácsborsód. His father left the family when Moholy-Nagy was a boy. His mother and her family raised Moholy-Nagy and his two brothers. …


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At his home in 2012, Alexander Tarics, then the oldest living Olympic champ, shows his gold medal for water polo in 1936 and Olympic participant medal.

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At a graphic arts school in Budapest, Muray studied lithography, photo engraving, and photography. Upon earning an international engraver’s certificate, Muray enrolled in a three-year course focused on the art of color photo engraving in Berlin.

As war quickly approached in 1913 Europe, Muray journeyed to American where he was able to find work as a color printer in Brooklyn, New York.

Soon after Muray opened a portrait studio in Greenwich Village and in 1921 was commissioned by Harper’s Bazaar to photograph Broadway actress, Florence Reed. This led to regular national work, quickly garnering Muray national recognition.

In 1926 Vanity Fair magazine sent Muray to Europe to photograph artist Claude Monet and author George Bernard Shaw and many other well known faces. …

About

The Magyar Foundation

The Magyar Foundation of North America is dedicated to the advancement of Hungarian heritage, cultural pride, and accomplishments in the United States.

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