Books for Restless People

From one restless soul to another, here are the books I’ve actually read that have fed me and the beast.

TRACKS — ROBYN DAVIDSON

True story about a girl who walks across the Australian desert with a dog and camels. The desert will call to you through this book and it will not stop. (I’m coming as soon as I can!)

“And there are new kinds of nomads, not people who are at home everywhere, but who are at home nowhere. I was one of them.”

ON THE ROAD — JACK KEROUAC

Mad and wild boys driving across America. The writing is truly beautiful and invigorating and I can’t deny its effect on me and my writing.

“I was surprised, as always, by how easy the act of leaving was, and how good it felt. The world was suddenly rich with possibility.”

INTO THE WILD — JOHN KRAKAUER

Slightly rude but brave boy takes to the wilds of America. Being against capitalism is always a good thing.

“But in reality nothing is more damaging to the adventurous spirit within a [wo]man than a secure future.”

THE DHARMA BUMS — JACK KEROUAC

The less popular but more interesting On the Road. Buddhism explored by mad and wild boys. To be read during a sweaty, sandy summer filled with frequent meditation.

“Happy. Just in my swim shorts, barefooted, wild-haired, in the red fire dark, singing, swigging wine, spitting, jumping, running — that’s the way to live.”

THE WILD THINGS — DAVE EGGERS

The novel adaptation of the movie adapted from a children’s book. It will send you howling into the woods.

“Animals howl, he had been told, to declare their existence.”

TRAVELS WITH MYSELF AND ANOTHER — MARTHA GELLHORN

I haven’t finished this one just yet but Gellhorn is a badass woman who wrote about wars andas a footnote, dated Hemingway.

“Nothing is better for self-esteem than survival.”

VAGABONDING — ROLF POTTS

A how to guide to liberation, great values, great musing.

“Having an adventure is sometimes just a matter of going out and allowing things to happen in a strange and amazing new environment — not so much a physical challenge as a psychic one.”

I have just about outgrown some of these books. The height of adventure doesn’t always have to be self destructive, philosophical romps written by men. So I’m exploring the woman adventurers and writing my own stories. Monty is my own restless book.

What have you read that got those itchy feet itchy?

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