In the lead-up to the G20 Summit in Osaka this summer, the American public called on President Donald Trump to take an aggressive (though somewhat retaliatory) approach; to discuss, in addition to ongoing situations in Syria and North Korea, Russian interference in US elections. However, contrary to the popular belief that diplomatic discussions between the US and Russia should revolve entirely around national security issues, it is crucial to consider the importance of entrepreneurial and academic innovation.

In order for the relationship between the US and Russia to improve, Russians and Americans need to collaborate in non-inflammatory areas, the most…

(Hey, that title rhymes!)

Net neutrality, as defined by the ACLU, “means applying well-established “common carrier” rules to the internet in order to preserve its freedom and openness.”¹ In layman’s terms, this translates to disallowing Internet Service Providers (hereafter referred to as ISPs) from slowing, limiting, or otherwise interfering with your internet traffic. Net neutrality, as it exists in U.S. law today, is within the protections provided by Title II of the Communications Act of 1934,² which effectively classifies internet service as a public utility. …

In the midst of all of this infighting amongst the crypto community, this endless debate over whose plan is most aligned with our hero, Satoshi Nakamoto, I want to ask a simple question: Does Satoshi’s original vision matter? Should we, (at the risk of sounding like members of a cult) the believers in the base technology he built, care what he would do now?

In my opinion, we shouldn’t.

In the same way that, in the United States of America, legislators (and voters behind them) have continued to iterate on a Constitution that’s hundreds of years old, developers today are…

Ever since the beginning of the digital era, and the propagation of consumer electronics, governments and other parties have attempted to surveil the populace, with ranging degrees of extremity and success. This paper aims to argue that, over time, the relative level of privacy available to the average user has decreased, and continues to trend in that direction. Relevant legislation will be listed and examined, asking the question of whether electronic privacy ever existed.

One thing that’s important to clarify when discussing the idea of “privacy” on the internet is that such a concept doesn’t simply include the specific examination…

Late, again, I know. Too late to save “privacy,” too late for the Internet, too late for freedom…or is it?

A little background first — last year, the FCC implemented a new set of rules, intended to protect the privacy of the average American, preventing Internet Service Providers from selling data and browsing history collected from their customers. However, in the last week or so, Congress voted to repeal those rules.

Before jumping into it, let’s step back for a second — Congress voted to repeal these rules, intended simply to protect the common man. One may argue that, if…

In two days, the Department of Justice will effectively be granted the ability to hack into anyone’s computer, worldwide. The best part — they don’t have to do anything for the “update” to be implemented.

The amendments to Rule 41, according to the official documents, gives “a magistrate judge with authority in any district where activities related to a crime may have occurred has authority to issue a warrant to use remote access to search electronic storage media and to seize or copy electronically stored information located within or outside that district if: (A) the district where the media or…

Only three days ago, Google launched their new phone(s), the Pixel, along with its bigger brother, the Pixel XL. It’s easy to get lost amongst the bullshit. Both versions of the phone are touted as having the “best camera ever.” They ship with Google’s new “Assistant,” something users of Allo may know of, a Siri/Alexa/Cortana-like humanoid version of Google Now. But what they don’t advertise is their new target audience.

In a world dominated by iOS devices (High school in an affluent, largely white area), I’ve long been a proponent of Android devices. However, it’s becoming harder and harder to…

Max Perrello

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