Thoughts on some in America who feel they are losing freedoms as “all men” continue to fight for and win equality

For those who have unflinchingly lauded and enjoyed America as a land of freedom, equality and justice for hundreds of years, it is becoming increasingly apparent that such enjoyments were established in word, but in action, were held in reservation for those in power when the system was established.

That’s why it now seems to some of you like you are starting to lose some of your freedoms — because many of your “freedoms” were and are incumbent upon the ignorance and/or subjugation of groups of fellow countrymen who previously couldn’t stand up and say, “We have the right to this freedom as promised, too.”

Therefore, yes, you are right, you ARE starting to lose some of your freedoms:

The freedom to declare a human a form of property because…

The freedom to invade and take a peoples’ land by force because…

The freedom to tell a woman she can’t sit at the front of the bus because…

The freedom to tell a woman or black man they cannot vote because…

The freedom to tell two people that they can’t marry because…

The freedom to infringe more upon a black man’s rights or a Muslim man’s rights because…

When those in power declare “all men are created equal”, and then “all men” spend the coming hundreds of years steadily standing up and fighting for their equality, it will feel to those who began with the most power as though such “freedoms”, such beliefs, such status quos, are under siege and being taken away.

Because they are.

Those who enjoy an unfair and lopsided power structure over any circumstance in a beginning will always maintain grievances when their power becomes uncomfortably equalized.

“In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A Prince whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people.” -Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776

Like what you read? Give Micah Grimes a round of applause.

From a quick cheer to a standing ovation, clap to show how much you enjoyed this story.