The Sweetness of Honey — Derived from Plant Nectar

Michael Luna is a respected San Francisco business executive who served as chief technology officer and board advisor with Aliphcom (dba Jawbone). His responsibilities included spearheading innovation and intellectual property protection strategies. Beyond his work with Jawbone, Michael Luna keeps bees and has a strong interest in the natural processes that create honey.

Honey’s sweetness have to do with nectar from the plants they pollinate, which is created by glands spanning the leaves, stems, and flowers. With sugar produced by plants through photosynthesis, the nectaries transform this into a sugar-and-water solution that contains a 10–30 percent concentration of sugar and has other trace nutritional elements. This nectar is digested by honeybees in creating high sugar content honey, which has many additional ingredients.

It is because of this high sugar content that honey crystallizes, with the speed at which this occurs having to do with the fructose to glucose ratio. Some honeys with extremely high ratios of fructose, such as those from Acacia flowers, will crystallize only after a very long time.

Michael Luna first worked with San Francisco’s Jawbone, in 2007 as an advisor to its board of directors and three months later accepted the position of its CTO.

Michael Luna first worked with San Francisco’s Jawbone, in 2007 as an advisor to its board of directors and three months later accepted the position of its CTO.