WEBCON quietly married workflow automation with interactive forms, and didn’t think it was anything special. I discovered Wizard Mode almost by accident, and I think it’s worth making some noise about…

I want to share a series of discoveries/observations I made as I decided to join WEBCON. This is workflow/process automation geek content, with some SharePoint geekery thrown in.

If you’re familiar with Nintex or SharePoint Designer, or you only know the flavor of Microsoft Flow that’s included with Office 365, this series of posts is about how WEBCON BPS is different (and often better) than those tools.

This time, we’re talking about user…


I want to share a series of discoveries/observations I made as I decided to join WEBCON. This is workflow/process automation geek content, with some SharePoint geekery thrown in.

If you’re familiar with Nintex or SharePoint Designer, or you only know the flavor of Microsoft Flow that’s included with Office 365, this series of posts is about how WEBCON BPS is different (and often better) than those tools.

This time I want to talk about data-tier issues. (I covered process and presentation tier issues in the last two posts in this series.)

Processes have Data Assets, Not Just External Connections

Processes aren’t just a workflow diagram and form specifications. There’s data, too. Yes, a process might connect to data that lives elsewhere, but I’m referring to data that belongs to the process itself. Sometimes you’d refer to it as form fields, workflow variables, or perhaps attachments. …


I’ll soon be adding content directly to WEBCON’s website, but I want to share a series of discoveries/observations I made on the way to joining them.

If you’re familiar with Nintex or SharePoint Designer, or you only know the flavor of Microsoft Flow that’s included with Office 365, this series of posts is about how WEBCON BPS is different (and often better) than those tools.

This time we’re talking about WEBCON’s approach to user interfaces.

Pretty much everyone else puts the data first, then UX, and makes the process almost an afterthought

The typical way an application is built looks something like this:

  1. Build some CRUD (Create/Retrieve/Update/Delete) forms for it.
  2. Add some reactive workflow logic to a new item, a changed item, a context menu click, etc. …

About

Mike Fitzmaurice

The original SharePoint evangelist, adept in business process/workflow automation, app integration, and low-code/no-code development. WEBCON’s VP-North America.

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