Why your learning and growth are slow

Another reason your learning and growth are slow

Pay-off: learn how to learn more efficiently

Investment: 1 minute

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Assuming that you’re already learning in the most effective style for you…

If you’re quick to agree with what you’re learning, or you’re soaking it up or practising it with ease, then you’re not really learning. You’re just familiarising yourself with something. You’re just slapping another layer of you on you. Which is easy, and feels good.

If on the other hand, you’re sparring or wrestling with the content or skills you’re learning, and you stick this out, then you’re probably learning.

Real learning happens where there’s friction, sparks, surprises and discomfort. It happens when you feel something pushing back on you.

Your time then is best spent picking something worthwhile to learn and consciously going in for the fight.

The Champ

And note, the champ doesn’t become the champ by just picking a fight with the content, author or presenter. That’s too obvious. And it only serves to preserve yourself. I’d go as far as to call it cowardly. No, the champ stands between the learning content and themselves and picks a fight and spars with both. And the champ is left standing in the middle.

Action

Ironically, a lot of ‘smart’ people fail to pick the fight with themselves. And so, whilst ‘smart’, they stay at the same level.

To learn more effectively, ask questions of both the content and yourself. Don’t look for information that supports what you already know. Look for the stuff that creates sparks and feels uncomfortable. And use it to ask yourself some new and interesting questions. What if it’s right, and it’s your mindset and approach that need some work?

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Originally published at MarkMoore.co.

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