Photo courtesy of Avery Evans via Unsplash.

Let’s talk about credit cards. Hot-button issue alert, right? Everybody has an opinion about them. Some good. Some bad. So how do you figure out what’s right for you?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer on this topic. It all comes down to you. Your situation, your goals, your spending habits, your philosophy on money, your values, and your discipline.

Credit cards are not good or evil. They’re just pieces of plastic (or metal, if you’re fancy). There are legitimate use cases for them. Just like there are legitimate risk factors.

But what makes a credit card a good or bad…


You Don’t Need College To Discover What Makes You Come Alive. But You Do Need This.

Everybody loves a good stock photo right? Well, I found this one on Unsplash from a talented photographer named Victor Rodriguez. Aside from the khakis this guy is wearing, the little jump thing he’s doing with the picturesque backdrop really gave me the sense this guy is living his life to the fullest (which is kinda the point of this post — and probably the only reason I chose this image over a picture of a basketful of puppies).

You don’t need a college degree. I know. Blasphemous, right? But it’s God’s honest truth. Today, there are countless other options available to you.

Options for you to discover what makes you come alive. To build the skills you need to earn whatever kind of money you aspire to make. Options that don’t require you to spend years in a classroom or go tens (if not hundreds) of thousands of dollars into student debt.

You don’t need good grades or top test scores to…


As I’m writing this, over 120,000 schools are closed across the United States due to COVID-19 — forcing well over 50 million students, teachers, and parents to figure out what to do next (and fast).

If you’re like me, then you’re searching for a silver lining. Maybe you’re asking yourself questions like:

  • What can I do if my [school / college / job] doesn’t reopen soon?
  • How can I make the most valuable use of my time?
  • What can I do now so I don’t fall behind learning?
  • If I wanted to start learning/teaching online, where would I even start?


Photo by Zac Durant on Unsplash

I haven’t been confident about what I believe for a long time.

Is God real? Does he love me? Has he spoken to me? Do I have a divine purpose?

It’s a problem I’ve wrestled with for years. The world pressures us to hold strong opinions about everything under the sun. And admitting I don’t know sucks.

But truth be told, when it comes to faith I just flat out do not know.

Longing for God

I want to believe. Honest. There are days when I long for God. To know there’s something bigger out there in the universe. Something divine. Something eternal.


Photo by Denys Nevozhai on Unsplash

A decade ago, legendary thinker Clayton Christensen delivered a powerful commencement to Harvard Business School grads. His speech came only months after overcoming the same type of cancer that had taken his father’s life — which gave extra pause for reflection.

Sadly, Christensen lost his battle with cancer earlier this year.

But he left behind a rich legacy of insight through writings like The Innovator’s Dilemma, The Prosperity Paradox, and many other best-sellers. Christensen spent the better part of his career asking important questions about how we can build better businesses and more fulfilling lives.

The past months, our team…


Photo by Ingo Stiller on Unsplash

Not unlike many kids, I believed I could be anything I wanted when I grew up. My parents encouraged it, too. But unlike many other kids, those “lofty ideas” did not fade as I grew up.

As far back as I can remember, I carried with me an innate, unshakeable belief not only that whatever I set my mind to was possible — I believed it was inevitable. And for years, I never questioned whether anyone else experienced the world any differently from me.

It was not until I reached adulthood that I began to question if this “belief” was…


Photo by timJ on Unsplash.

It’s easy to become a pessimist in the Information Age. Being an optimist is harder — it takes concentrated discipline. What’s harder still, I think, is not only recognizing the things unique to our time worth being optimistic about, but also learning to leverage those opportunities to create the life you want.

In honor of this Thanksgiving week, I want to organize some thoughts on why I think we live in one of the most exciting times in human history.

11 Trends in the Future of Work to Watch in 2020:

  1. Imagine A World Without Barriers to Capital
  2. Automation: The Terminator You Shouldn’t Fear
  3. The Emergence of the Global Talent Marketplace


I don’t have kids, but I used to be one.

Photo by Franck V. on Unsplash

Lately I’ve been seeing a lot of posts from people applauding the JUUL ban as a great move toward protecting “our youth”.

Yet I can’t help thinking that opinion is a bit moronic (even if well-intended).

It’s not because I want my nieces or nephews swallowing up lung-fulls of cotton-candy flavored poison, either. But, I do care about being honest and protecting our freedom to choose and learn for ourselves.

Personally, I don’t think banning tobacco protects kids from addiction. In many cases, I imagine it makes things worse — and I would know.

I was a heavy tobacco user…


This is not me. But you can imagine, right? Photo by Cole Keister on Unsplash.

It’s difficult to put into words just how embarrassing it felt to graduate college without a job.

I felt the weight of the world bearing down on me. The expectations of my parents, the scorn from professors, the joking behind my back from friends.

It’s not easy to make that walk of shame from college into the real world. But — I think it’s a much better move than getting roped into a cushy career path you end up hating.

At least, it worked for me.

What I didn’t know then that I know now — opting for a series of low-paying, low-status jobs while I figured out what I wanted to do proved to be the…


It’s time we all broke up with Aunt Becky’s ideas.

A bunch of rich kids and their parents cheated the system — again.

People lined up crying for justice.

Public outrage ensued.

A media frenzy stole the national spotlight.

The FBI stormed in hammering down celebrity indictments faster and harder than your grandma playing Slapjack.

Sh*t got real. Rightly so. Because the circus came to town early this year.

Meanwhile, high school seniors and their parents squirm — “But I can’t afford to cheat the system,” they think silently to themselves. “Is that what it takes to get accepted at a good school?”

You gotta feel for the students who…

Mitchell Earl

COO @DiscoverPraxis | I write education, career, and money advice for young adults who are just getting started. New book coming summer ‘21.

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