Truffle Mac

Image by MiyokosKitchen.com

Everyone’s favorite comfort food can now be made in minutes using our Aged English Sharp Farmhouse. With a splash of truffle oil and some Brussel Sprouts or veggies thrown in, this is a dish that will surely please everyone from kids to grandparents.

Our Sharp Farmhouse can easily be transformed into a rich, creamy sauce for macaroni or pasta simply by heating with a non-dairy milk. With a splash of truffle oil to heighten the experience and some Brussel Sprouts or veggies thrown in, this is a dish that will surely please everyone from kids to grandparents. But don’t just stop there — pour the sauce over a baked potato or veggies, or stir in some jalapenos for a quick queso for nachos — it’s that versatile!

  • 12 ounces macaroni or penne pasta (try gluten-free)
  • 8 ounces Brussel Sprouts, trimmed and cut in half
  • 3 cups nondairy milk
  • 13 ounces (2 wheels) Aged English Sharp Farmhouse, cut into ½-inch cubes or grated
  • ¼ cup white wine, optional
  • 1 tablespoon white truffle oil
  • Salt and pepper

Start by bringing a large pot of water to a boil. Salt the water, then cook the pasta according to package directions, undercooking it by a minute or two to ensure the proper al dente texture. During the last two minutes of cooking, however, add the Brussel sprouts to the pot so that they cook alongside the pasta. Drain well.

Meanwhile, prepare the cheese sauce. In a medium saucepan, heat the nondairy milk over medium heat until hot. Add the cheese and white wine, and continue to cook over low heat, stirring frequently, until the cheese has completely melted and the sauce is thick and creamy. Stir in the truffle oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Combine with the hot, cooked pasta and Brussel sprouts, and serve immediately as a creamy mac and cheese, or transfer to a casserole dish, top with bread crumbs, and bake at 400ºF for 30 minutes until bubbling to serve as a baked mac and cheese. Serve hot and enjoy!

This post was originally posted in MiyokosKitchen.com

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