Run, don’t walk

Picking up the pace of social innovation.

If your family were in danger, how fast would you move? What lengths would you travel in order to ensure their survival? What obstacles would you allow to get in your way?

Like most of us, you’re rarely faced with this dilemma. Our basic needs are met. In our decadence, we’ve lowered the standard for what constitutes hardship and struggle. As we swipe through life on thousand dollar smartphones and limitless conveniences, we’re deceived into thinking we understand suffering. On most days, a veil has been erected between our existence and those who are truly in need.

Removed from the day to day pain of chronic poverty and heartache, we exist in a world that feels somewhat whole. Though imperfect, it can feel as though the world today is somehow better, safer, or more promising than in previous decades. Unfortunately, for over 1 BILLION people on Earth today, that simply is not true.

We call the condition survival mode. With life’s most basic needs unmet, each day is a battle to survive with millions loosing the fight. Men, women, children…fathers, mothers, sisters, brothers, loved ones, friends.

If this was your family, how fast would you move? What lengths would you travel in order to ensure their survival? What obstacles would you allow to get in your way?

At New Story, we’ve come to accept the fact that conventional methods are not enough. If we hope to see a world where no human lives in survival mode, significant improvements need to combine with massive action. As a symbol of the impact and innovation we believe is necessary, today we’re thrilled to introduce the first 3D printed home built for the developing world.

Developed in partnership with Icon, a construction technology company, this tech will reduce the cost of each home, increase the speed of construction, and allow for rapid improvements in quality. While version 1 was printed in Texas, we hope to begin building in El Salvador by the end of 2018.

Get the full story and more… 3dhome.org

It’s unclear what the future holds or if this machinery is what the developing world needs. What is clear however, is our commitment to pushing the pace of aid. Remaining idle or leisurely about 1 billion people is unacceptable.

There will be mistakes, missteps, and even failures along the way. Regardless of the cost, the fact remains: It’s irresponsible not to try.