5 Scholar-Approved Study Spots

By: Autumn Schramm, Academic Transition Programs

Having the right place to study is just as important as having good study skills. It’s been proven that where you study can impact how well you absorb information — so make the most of your study environment!

Background noise, smells, light, and temperature all affect how your brain and body store information.

Here are our top 5 study spots around campus — use this info to successfully study for your exams and get that A!

On campus:

Health and Learning Center — upper floors

The Health and Learning center holds more than the Rec and Campus Health Services. Did you know there are some amazing study rooms on the upper levels?

If spacious views and natural light get your brain in gear — head to the third floor for overlooks of the San Francisco Peaks. With lots of tables and comfortable chairs for you to lounge around in, you’ll be in prime shape to get your study on.

Just down the south hallways on the third floor, you will find a handful of small study rooms that can comfortably fit about four people.

White board walls, windows, and plugs for all your electronic devices make these rooms great for group meetings. These rooms are open and available for use on a first come first serve basis and close when the entire building closes at night. If you want to use the white boards, bring your dry erase markers and an eraser and study away!

Cline Library — Second Floor

Ahh Cline… we meet again.

The library is everyone’s first study spot idea. The first floor is mostly used for group projects and can get a bit loud for people who need silence to read and take notes. Take the winding staircase to the second and third floors to escape the noise and find a secluded spot to get immersed in your lecture notes.

The second floor has a plethora of spaces that you can settle in and stay for a while. This floor allows whispers and small discussions, but stray away from group meetings here.

The third floor of the library is reserved for silence, so if you need complete quiet to think, head here!

Lumberjack tip: Bring your ID card — the library doors require you to scan your ID after 9pm!

Science and Health Building — upper floors

You don’t have to be a science major to enjoy all of this building’s amazing amenities. The new Science and Health building has has many places to offer in terms of ideal study spots.

The higher up in the building you go, the fewer classrooms there are. Giant widows allow for stunning views of the pedway and Peaks. Natural light pours in and can even warm the chairs before you take your seat!

Forgot to charge your phone or laptop overnight? Don’t fret! The tables and seats in this building have plugs and ports built in to ensure you can charge up as you study. Don’t get caught with a dead device!

Off campus

Campus Coffee Bean

Coffee and studying go hand in hand for almost all Lumberjacks. Campus Coffee Bean is right off campus and provides a great atmosphere for people who don’t mind a little background noise. Head here to meet up with friends for an informal study session or grab a coffee between classes.

CCB has great Wi-Fi, friendly staff, and an outdoor seating option so you can enjoy that fresh mountain air while you review your flashcards. CCB is located in the parking lot on the corner of West University Drive and Milton Road, in the same parking lot as NiMarcos Pizza.

Late for the Train

Late for the Train is another coffee-lover’s paradise. Located downtown, this study spot allows for a mental break and beautiful sneak-peak into the heart of Flagstaff. Walk or ride your bike here for a great exercise break and get your mental juices flowing!

Late for the Train is located on the corner of Birch and North San Francisco, right across from the Coconino County Superior Court. Private tables with great WiFi and easily accessible outlets allow for highly productive study-group meetings.


Have another study spot we should check out? Send your ideas to social@nau.edu.

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