IVR: How to prevent it from Fraud in Contact Center Business?

Interactive Voice Response system is essential for all kind of call center business. An Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system is a call center software feature that facilitates self-service call segmentation and routing by enabling callers to make choices using spoken or typed commands on the telephone keypad.

Most consumers are familiar with IVR systems, whether or not they are aware of what the acronym stands for. Many may associate IVRs with the standard initial language selection, often “Press 1 for English.

How it works?

IVR systems pick up the calls, greet the callers warmly with perfect accent and assist them to the relevant agent according to their need and department of inquiry. They do all these functions by pressing required keys from the side of callers. As the caller selects menu stimuli, the system begins to go through down who or what the best end goal will be using skills-based routing.

The fundamental purpose of the IVR is to ensure that callers are in flight correctly to increase efficiency and first call resolution. Common IVR applications include:

· Bank and stock account balances and transfers

· Surveys and polls

· Office call routing

· Call center forwarding

· Simple order entry transactions

· Selective information lookup

Hackers and fraudsters have a seemingly never-ending bag of tricks in their ongoing attempts to steal others’ vital information for their own nefarious purposes. So it should come as no surprise that one of their more common methods is trying to spoof Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems to gain valuable data about someone else.

There are some ways which can be adopted by call centers to prevent fraud in the context of IVR department:

Use strong passwords:

Although it may seem obvious, passwords are one of the best weapons you can use in the battle against toll fraud. If you’ve picked a simple password that includes your name or other public information, or even kept the factory-set default password for your IVR, you’re leaving yourself open to attack.

First and foremost and we can’t stress this enough, always reset the default password on your PBX. When you create a new one, be sure to include a combination of lower and upper case letters, special characters, and numbers. You should also ensure that your password is at least 8 characters long.

It’s also a good idea to change your IVR’s password whenever an employee who previously had access leaves your company. It’s not personal, it’s just best practice.

Set up a firewall:

Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) is often used to create firewalls that help to protect VoIP phone systems from fraud. A SIP-based firewall, which inspects both voice and data packets as they pass through your network, can be used as a filter for fraudulent calling.

Implement international calling restrictions:

Many VoIP phone systems can be configured to restrict international calling entirely, or to allow secured access. If your business makes a lot of international phone calls, consider adding an extra layer of security, such as an authorization code that must be inputted before placing an international or long distance call.

If you’re not sure how to add this extra precaution, contact your VoIP service provider for assistance.

Review your call logs regularly:

This is another simple but important step in preventing toll fraud. Most VoIP phone system interfaces allow you to track incoming and outgoing calls; be sure to look at these on a weekly, if not daily basis.

If your business is primarily domestic, any international call should be a red flag. Businesses that do make a lot of long distance calls should be aware of the countries where toll fraud most often occurs.

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