The reality is that men do engage in lewd and often disgusting conversations in private.
Publius Americanus
21

The problem is not that Trump’s words were “lewd” and “disgusting.” It is that they celebrated assault. Some men engage in lewd conversations and some don’t, but for those who do, it is possible to do so without celebrating assault. And the rest of us need to call them out on it when we hear it. That is my entire point. To just dismiss it as something that happens will only make it worse, and build the permission structures for rape culture.

Regarding actual assault from Trump, we ARE hearing about it.

Jill Harth: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/09/opinion/sunday/donald-trump-groper-in-chief.html

Temple Taggart and others at the same event: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/15/us/politics/donald-trump-women.html

CNN’s Erin Burnett’s friend: http://www.cnn.com/2016/10/08/politics/donald-trump-woman-incident/

Katie Johnson: http://www.snopes.com/2016/06/23/donald-trump-rape-lawsuit/

Ivana Trump: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/07/27/ex-wife-donald-trump-made-feel-violated-during-sex.html

Leveling an accusation against a celebrity is a scary thing. The accused has a lot of power and can usually ruin the accuser. This has been especially true throughout our history for women. As a result, the victims often stay quiet — but there’s strength in numbers. When one or two stories come out, it can encourage other victims to come forward. We saw this with Bill Cosby, Roger Ailes, and Trevor Fitzgibbon; I think we’re seeing the beginning of it with Donald Trump now.

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