Shut up about the Student Loans Already

Lately, everyone has been squealing like little piggies about the student loan debt “crisis”. Well, according the cognescenti out there, it is the end of the world because kids coming out of school are now saddled with an average of around 33K for their bachelors.

Huh?

Let us hearken back to the stone age here buckaroos. It is 1982 and your humble correspondent had just graduated from the U. of Utah with a shiny Bachelors diploma. and $12,500 in student loans. I cannot for a minute say that it was pleasant paying the thing off, but it got paid and it really wasn’t all that painful. Granted, I drove used cars until 1990, and I wasn’t able to hang and drink as much with my rich buddies as I wished, but that would have been true with or without the debt overhang.

Let me make this clear. It is my contention that having your cost of education of equal value to your first decent car is not unreasonable. I refer to this as the “Camaro” principle. If your education/indoctrination/ticket punching is not worth as much to you as the car that your id so desires, then why the hell are you going to school anyway?

A tricked-out Camaro in 1982 would have run me around 12K. I went to GM’s website just now and priced out a pretty nice ride and came up with 34K. I don’t think that this is an odd coincidence.

In a nutshell, stop whining. Look, education costs money and time and effort. If you have rich parents, good on you, let them pay for it. But you had better remember that your parents worked and saved for ten years to pay for your God-given right to attend classes and learn about beer-bongs.

But if you are like the rest of us, you will have to take forego some fancy shit for the first ten or so years of your working years to pay for a very pleasant set of memories memories and skills. Those will last a lot longer than that piece of shit Camaro that is currently being melted down in a Chinese steel mill.

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