Globes in a school classroom
Globes in a school classroom
Image: AdobeStock.

Steve Puttick and Amber Murrey

Geography’s problem with race has deep roots: the subject emerged in part to as a tool of empire. Many have critiqued the discipline’s enduring whiteness. England’s problems with race are intertwined with these historical legacies as well as their persistence in the present, albeit frequently cloaked in the cultural context of ‘post-racial’ ideologies which cast racism as a thing of the past.

Yet, learning about geography in England should necessarily involve learning about the uncomfortable geographies of British colonialism and inequality. We can pull from intellectual resources of the subject to address ongoing issues of environmental racism, urban inequalities, international development, the uneven costs and rewards of resource extraction and more. …


Black History Month text
Black History Month text

This Black History Month, the University is highlighting the power of excellence and academic achievement, past and present, and how the contributions of Black people have contributed to the calibre of the University’s reputation.

(Read The Oxford BHM 100 — Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3 here)

Concluding our series highlighting the power of excellence and academic achievement, past and present, and how the contributions of Black people contribute to the calibre of the University’s reputation.

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Professor Patricia Daley


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This Black History Month, the University is highlighting the power of excellence and academic achievement, past and present, and how the contributions of Black people have contributed to the calibre of the University’s reputation.

Continuing our series celebrating the power of academic achievement and how Black people, past and present, have contributed to the calibre of Oxford University’s reputation and understanding of Black experiences.

(Read The Oxford BHM 100 — Part 1 and Part 2 here)

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Professor Dapo Akande

Professor of Public International Law at the Blavatnik School of Government, Fellow at Exeter College and Co-Director of the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict (ELAC)


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Director of the Oxford Centre for Religion and Culture, Fellow of Regent’s Park College

Dr Anthony G. Reddie is a self-described activist scholar, who has written more than 70 essays and articles and 19 books that firmly position Black liberation theology at the forefront of the practical theology discussion.

At its core, Black liberation theology began as an effort — in a white-dominated society, to make the church and its teachings relevant to the life and struggles of Black Americans, and, overtime, in the words of James H. …


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This Black History Month, the University is highlighting the power of excellence and academic achievement, past and present, and how the contributions of Black people have contributed to the calibre of the University’s reputation.

Continuing our series celebrating the power of academic achievement and how Black people, past and present, have contributed to the calibre of Oxford University’s reputation and understanding of Black experiences.

Each nomination was submitted by a member — or sometimes multiple members — of our student, staff, alumni and donor community, because of the impact it has had on them personally. The entries have their own unique value, and are not placed in any particular order.

(Read The Oxford BHM 100 — Part 1 here)

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La June Montgomery Tabron

‘Bynum Tudor’ Fellow at Kellogg College, President and CEO of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF)


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This Black History Month, the University is highlighting the power of excellence and academic achievement, past and present, and how the contributions of Black people have contributed to the calibre of the University’s reputation.

Ranging from innovators, to creators and thought-leaders, each entry on the Oxford BHM 100 was nominated by a member — or sometimes multiple members — of our student, staff, alumni and donor community, because of the impact it has had on them personally. Whether by informing new perspectives, embodying the strength it takes to be a pioneer, or simply bringing the voters joy, each entry exemplifies the power of excellence, the essence of Black History Month.

The individuals featured are celebrated for the contributions that they have made — and in some cases, continue to make — to their fields of expertise, and the people they inspire to make their own mark on the world, as they follow behind them. …


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The Forest Fire-© Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford.

Abigail Buglass, Departmental Lecturer in Latin Language and Literature, Corpus Christi College.

Lucretius is one of the most captivating authors of antiquity. His epic poem describes a universe without gods, insisting instead that everything in the universe consists of atoms and void. Strict determinism is only avoided because the atoms are said to be subject to what Epicureans called the “swerve”. Such a radically materialist worldview has meant that the poem has provoked ambivalent reactions ever since its publication, and especially after its rediscovery in 1417. The poem has enjoyed something of a revival in recent years: the New Yorker recently published a piece on Lucretius by Stephen Greenblatt, author of the Pulitzer-winning book, The Swerve, which argues for the poet’s influence on modern thought. But Lucretius’s plague is a puzzling and abrupt ending to his poem. It is so utterly devastating that many believe that the poem was left incomplete; but what if it is the ending Lucretius intended? …


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Working from home. Sarah says: ‘I think the remote Trinity term was what got me through the worst of lockdown. It gave me something to focus on, and I really do enjoy my subject.’

Part 4: Discovering hidden resilience as an estranged student during lockdown

For Sarah James-Short, commencing her studies at Oxford University as an estranged student was daunting, and initially she struggled to find her feet. However, with support from her college and the friends she made, Sarah found a warm welcome and great fulfilment studying her favourite subject as a valued History undergraduate.

Estranged students are young people studying without the support of a family network. Some young people in this position have no contact at all with their family and have removed themselves from a dysfunctional situation.

In the fourth part of our quarantine life series, Sarah shares the support networks she developed at university but how lockdown brought its own particular stresses. Sarah explains how she discovered a hidden resilience during this tough time and is now making the most of summer with a Prince’s Trust Internship. …


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Hannah Lloyd

Part 3: What could be possible if we changed the status quo?

Anything that negatively affects students hits my heart, but when I’m affected too there’s a different way of coping required because as a staff member my role is to get the best outcomes for students

In the third part of our quarantine life series, Hannah Lloyd, Student Engagement Coordinator at the Oxford Student Union, shares the things that have helped her through this difficult period. She also discusses her experience of both being furloughed and working to build lasting, positive connections with students at a time of such instability, from her home in Birmingham.

(Read Part 1: The Revolution will be organised! and Part 2: Celebrating Ramadan in lockdown


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The Islamic Student Society team: (from left) Abdul Lateef, Rashma Rahman, Basim Khajwal, Noor Qurashi and Muaz Nawaz

Part 2: Celebrating Ramadan in lockdown

In the second of our series exploring coronavirus lockdown life for members of the Oxford University community, key members behind the first edition of the Islamic Student Society (ISoc) magazine IKHLAAS share how the publication has helped them to not only stay connected during the pandemic, but to celebrate Ramadan together.

(Read Part 1: The Revolution will be organised! here)

How have you found lockdown personally? — Noor Qurashi, Editor (Oriel College)

I’ve missed face-to-face interactions, but oddly enough what I’ve realised is just how powerful the internet is and how it can in many ways actually be used to simulate the community spirit that would normally grow out of real-life interactions. …

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