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Whether you have sweet or bitter feeling about your father, you can likely find some gratitude for his part in bringing you into human form so you could experience the gift of this life. Without him, you would not be breathing — let alone reading this!

Today in particular, I think lovingly of my dad, Dennis Rose. He was a respected fine artist and portraitist who also ran a multimedia house and graphic design studio first in Montreal, where I grew up, then in Toronto, where we moved when I was halfway through high school.

Gifted with obvious artistic talent recognized at an early age, he won the Elizabeth T. Greenshield’s Memorial Scholarship to study art. He chose the Byam Shaw School of Art in London, England, where he lived and studied for four years. …


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Every one of us goes through times where we feel indecisive, stressed, or even overwhelmed. But there is a solace and clarity always available to us. They do not come from somewhere outside ourselves, but from our inherent nature. Beneath all the stories our mind may conjure is a substratum of deep inner wisdom.

Yet when we lose sight of our nature, we can forget we are a part of that immense love and wisdom. I used to think that in order to access guidance, I had to go outside of myself. It took an immense wake-up call, in the form of an illness many years ago that almost claimed my life, before I began to deeply honour my inner voice. I now understand more clearly how Nature has graciously given us a built-in guidance system. We may touch it at times through “a-ha” moments that come unexpectedly in many forms. But there are also three qualities that, when we cultivate them together, will bring us into contact with our inner guidance in every moment of our lives. …


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Whose “fault” is it?

When you look at today’s world with its pollution, poverty, starvation, vanishing glaciers, clear-cut forests and bleaching coral reefs, how do you feel? Deep sadness? Numbness? Or maybe even resentment? How do you feel about the idea of finding inner peace when all this is happening? Go deep. Be honest.

It is very easy to slip into something like “Why should I have to find peace amidst all this, when the previous generation (or big business, or political leaders, et cetera) are responsible for these problems?” Feeling this way does not make us bad people. It is just a tendency. …


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Last time I was in New York City, I had an experience that taught me about finding inner peace, no matter where I may be. I had traveled to the city center to go to — of all things — a meditation retreat. After a beautiful few days of practicing inner stillness and presence, I vividly remember the midday in July that I stepped out of the cocoon-like intimacy I had just experienced, back into the bustling city. Rather than concrete and steel, the cityscape looked luminous, as though everything was made of light. As I looked up at Manhattan’s textured skyline, it seemed to shimmer. The world looked vibrant and alive, and at the same time, not at all real. As I paused to breathe it all in, I sensed I might be glimpsing through what the ancient yogic sages referred to as maya, the veil-like illusion of life from which we must all awaken to fully realize our divine Self. It was not that it looked two-dimensional. …


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When we touch inner peace, we enter into luminous and boundless space within us. This beautiful experience is not one that our limited ego-minds can truly grasp nor our words describe. Instead, we meet that expanse in the wordless compassion of our hearts when we are open, ready and willing.

Because language is limited, the words that point the way there can seem paradoxical at times. For example, it is common to think that peace is something to build. Yet as we cultivate inner peace, we are not really building anything, but discovering what is inherent within us as our true nature. We are coming into harmony with our self and our environment in order to experience the perfection of the moment. …


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I would like to share something I have learned that deeply influences my creative work. I believe it is universal to all art—be it music, vlogs, embroidery or street murals.

My artistic energy has had a singular focus for the past couple of years: creating the content for the Global Education Strategy (GES) for MAPS, the Marine Arctic Peace Sanctuary. Embracing the power of modern media, the GES is intended to generate the necessary momentum to create MAPS, the world’s largest protected area, and safeguard our planet’s air conditioner, the Arctic sea ice.

Obviously, the success of the GES means the world to me—literally! So I have been bringing all of my experience and training together for this purpose. Through this, I have been considering the essential elements at the core of all lasting works of art. What were the keys to success in the music of pioneers like Prince, timeless classic movies like Star Wars, and masterpieces like Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa or Picasso’s Three Musicians? …


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To live in peace is to live free from fear of violence, conflict, hostility, tension and aggression. When we live in peace, we live in unity and wholeness. We are rooted in interconnection. There is reverence for all life, because we understand that we are one with the essential fabric of the universe.

In peacefulness, there is no againstness. Againstness arises as an expression of our ego, which only knows to separate and divide. Feeling separate from love is the source of tension, conflict and violence. In essence, we don’t need to learn to “keep” peace. …


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I often say that most disputes would be resolved if we could only remember kindergarten logic — if I break your toy, I fix it; if you break mine, you fix it. In a world of ego strutting, lawsuits and elbowing to get ahead, we can easily forget the simplicity of our interconnection and common sense ethical values that make the world a happier place. No matter how acclaimed, influential, educated or socially prominent we may be, we have not yet graduated from kindergarten if we don’t possess basic kindness and respect.

We each are guardians of our inner child. We are called to take care of, listen to and honour the one within our heart and soul who knows exactly what she needs to follow her joy. That inner child is the one who sings effortlessly from her heart and shares that joyful light with the world. As we follow that joy, we are inevitably in a state of respect to all living things, because we honour and respect ourselves, which is connected to all. …


Before I committed to a full-time musical career, I had trained as an architect.

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I graduated from the highly competitive co-op program at the University of Waterloo School of Architecture, and had begun a promising career before I realized that my heart and soul urged me to go in a different direction.

Today, though my work is in a recording studio rather than on drafting boards, I am deeply grateful for all I learned as an architect. It informs what I do as an artist — both practically, in terms of the sonic structures in my compositions or the costumes that I build for my shows, and philosophically, because it has taught me the three keys to artistic works that last. …


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The more I learn of whales, the more I am awed by their massive, compassionate and wise presence. They seem to me to be master yogis, in constant co-creation with and in service to the whole. With World Oceans Day this week, it is a great time to celebrate these exceptional beings and share how whales can inspire your yoga practice.

Through YEM: Yoga as Energy Medicine, the form of yoga I developed and teach, you cultivate awareness of two-way moving energy in every pose, to revel in a constant flow between you, the earth and the cosmos. Whales are one of the most beautiful, natural expressions of two-way moving, co-creative energy. In what is known as the “whale pump effect”, these huge sonic creatures dive into the dark depths to feed, then return to the surface to breathe and excrete. This upward and downward flow, that seems to move in graceful figure eights, stirs the ocean waters. It brings nutrients from the depths, where the sun does not reach, up to where light penetrates the water. In the sparkling top ocean layer, the whales’ fecal plumes fertilize the phytoplankton, giving them essential iron and nitrogen so that they can grow and capture carbon from the atmosphere. These tiny organisms in turn feed the fish that whales and other marine life feed upon, so that the entire food chain is enriched. …

About

Parvati

Positive Possibilities. http://Parvati.tv: Activism in music, yoga and words. http://Parvati.org: declare the Marine Arctic Peace Sanctuary to protect all life.

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